Comparison of multidetector computed tomography versus echocardiography for assessing regional left ventricular function

Jonathan Lessick, Diab Mutlak, Shmuel Rispler, Eduard Ghersin, Robert Dragu, Diana Litmanovich, Ahuva Engel, Shimon A. Reisner, Yoram Agmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the heart is a rapidly developing technique mainly used to evaluate the coronary arteries. However, it is also capable of evaluating ventricular function. It compares well with magnetic resonance imaging in calculating volumes and ejection fractions, but little has been reported on its ability to assess left ventricular (LV) segmental wall motion (LVSWM). This study compared semiquantitative LVSWM scoring by MDCT with echocardiography as the gold standard. Thirty-nine patients underwent MDCT angiography on a 16-slice scanner. Short- and long-axis LV slices were created at different phases of the cardiac cycle and visually evaluated using cine mode. Echocardiography was performed <48 hours after MDCT for 21 patients after acute myocardial infarctions and <1 month after MDCT for 18 patients without acute myocardial infarctions. Two blinded observers scored the MDCT and echocardiographic examinations according to the 16-segment model, scoring each segment from 1 (normal) to 3 (akinetic). Segmental dysfunction was found in 27 patients by echocardiography and in 24 by MDCT. An identical score was given by the 2 methods in 502 of 616 assessable segments (82%). Using a binary analysis (normal or abnormal), there was 89% agreement (546 of 616 segments). MDCT had a sensitivity of 66% (103 of 155 segments) and a specificity of 96% (443 of 461 segments) compared with echocardiography as the gold standard. Most disagreements occurred in the right coronary artery segments. In conclusion, MDCT can be used to evaluate LVSWM, showing good agreement with echocardiography, except for the right coronary artery segments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1015
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume96
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Multidetector Computed Tomography
Left Ventricular Function
Echocardiography
Coronary Vessels
Myocardial Infarction
Ventricular Function
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Comparison of multidetector computed tomography versus echocardiography for assessing regional left ventricular function. / Lessick, Jonathan; Mutlak, Diab; Rispler, Shmuel; Ghersin, Eduard; Dragu, Robert; Litmanovich, Diana; Engel, Ahuva; Reisner, Shimon A.; Agmon, Yoram.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 96, No. 7, 01.10.2005, p. 1011-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lessick, Jonathan ; Mutlak, Diab ; Rispler, Shmuel ; Ghersin, Eduard ; Dragu, Robert ; Litmanovich, Diana ; Engel, Ahuva ; Reisner, Shimon A. ; Agmon, Yoram. / Comparison of multidetector computed tomography versus echocardiography for assessing regional left ventricular function. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2005 ; Vol. 96, No. 7. pp. 1011-1015.
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