Comparison of azithromycin and moxifloxacin against bacterial isolates causing conjunctivitis

Christina Ohnsman, David Ritterband, Terrence O'Brien, Dalia Girgis, Al Kabat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine in vitro resistance to azithromycin and moxifloxacin in bacterial conjunctivitis isolates. Methods: MIC90s (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration) and resistance rates to azithromycin and moxifloxacin were determined based upon microtiter broth dilution and/or antimicrobial gradient test strips in a multicenter phase III study and confirmed externally. Results: The most common isolates collected from bacterial conjunctivitis patients in the phase III study were Haemophilus influenzae (40.6%), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (19.3 %), Propionibacterium acnes (17.3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (16.8%), and Staphylococcus aureus (0.06%). MIC 90s for all of these organisms were well below established resistance breakpoints for moxifloxacin, indicating no bacterial resistance. On the other hand, the MIC90 for H. influenzae was 3-fold higher than the resistance breakpoint for azithromycin, ≥ 128-fold higher for S. epidermidis, 16-fold higher for S. pneumoniae and ≥ 128-fold higher for S. aureus, indicating moderate to very high bacterial resistance to azithromycin. Conclusions: Resistance to azithromycin is more common than resistance to moxifloxacin in clinical isolates causing bacterial conjunctivitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2241-2249
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Medical Research and Opinion
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Azithromycin
Conjunctivitis
Bacterial Conjunctivitis
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Haemophilus influenzae
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Staphylococcus aureus
Propionibacterium acnes
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
moxifloxacin

Keywords

  • Azithromycin
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Fluoroquinolone
  • Macrolide
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Comparison of azithromycin and moxifloxacin against bacterial isolates causing conjunctivitis. / Ohnsman, Christina; Ritterband, David; O'Brien, Terrence; Girgis, Dalia; Kabat, Al.

In: Current Medical Research and Opinion, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.09.2007, p. 2241-2249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohnsman, Christina ; Ritterband, David ; O'Brien, Terrence ; Girgis, Dalia ; Kabat, Al. / Comparison of azithromycin and moxifloxacin against bacterial isolates causing conjunctivitis. In: Current Medical Research and Opinion. 2007 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 2241-2249.
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