Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction

S. Mohammad Mavadati, Huanghao Feng, Anibal Gutierrez, Mohammad H. Mahoor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Robots are becoming a part of humans' social life as assistants, companionbots, therapists, and entertainers. One promising application of the socially assistive robots is in autism therapy, where robots are employed to enhance verbal and nonverbal skills (e.g. eye-gaze attention, facial expression mimicry) of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). One important question is 'How the gaze responses of individuals with ASD differ from that of Typically Developing (TD) peers when interacting with a robot?' We present the results of our recent studies for modeling and analyzing the gaze pattern of children with ASD when they interact with a robot called NAO. This paper reports the differences of gaze responses of TD and ASD group in two conversational contexts: Speaking versus Listening. We used Variable-order Markov Model (VMM) to discover the temporal gaze directional patterns of ASD and TD groups. The results reveal that the gaze responses of the TD individuals in speaking and listening contexts, can be best modeled by VMM with order zero and three, respectively. As we expected, the result show that the temporal gaze patterns of typically developed children are varying when the role in the conversational context is changed. However for the ASD individuals for both conversational contexts the VMM with order one could best fit the data. Overall, the results conclude that VMM is a powerful technique to model different gaze responses of TD and ASD individuals in speaking and listening contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages1128-1133
Number of pages6
Volume2015-February
ISBN (Print)9781479971749
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 12 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event2014 14th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Humanoids 2014 - Madrid, Spain
Duration: Nov 18 2014Nov 20 2014

Other

Other2014 14th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Humanoids 2014
CountrySpain
CityMadrid
Period11/18/1411/20/14

Fingerprint

Human robot interaction
Robots

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Mavadati, S. M., Feng, H., Gutierrez, A., & Mahoor, M. H. (2015). Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction. In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Vol. 2015-February, pp. 1128-1133). [7041510] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HUMANOIDS.2014.7041510

Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction. / Mavadati, S. Mohammad; Feng, Huanghao; Gutierrez, Anibal; Mahoor, Mohammad H.

IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots. Vol. 2015-February IEEE Computer Society, 2015. p. 1128-1133 7041510.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mavadati, SM, Feng, H, Gutierrez, A & Mahoor, MH 2015, Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction. in IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots. vol. 2015-February, 7041510, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 1128-1133, 2014 14th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Humanoids 2014, Madrid, Spain, 11/18/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/HUMANOIDS.2014.7041510
Mavadati SM, Feng H, Gutierrez A, Mahoor MH. Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction. In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots. Vol. 2015-February. IEEE Computer Society. 2015. p. 1128-1133. 7041510 https://doi.org/10.1109/HUMANOIDS.2014.7041510
Mavadati, S. Mohammad ; Feng, Huanghao ; Gutierrez, Anibal ; Mahoor, Mohammad H. / Comparing the gaze responses of children with autism and typically developed individuals in human-robot interaction. IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots. Vol. 2015-February IEEE Computer Society, 2015. pp. 1128-1133
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