Comparing the efficacy and safety of Q-switched and picosecond lasers in the treatment of nevus of Ota: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Natalie M. Williams, Pooja Gurnani, Jun Long, John Reynolds, Yue Pan, Takahiro Suzuki, Ghadah I. Alhetheli, Keyvan Nouri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nevus of Ota is cosmetically burdensome and often prompts patients to seek treatment. Lasers are commonly used in removing these lesions; however, no systemic analysis has been conducted to support a gold standard laser. To conduct a meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers (QSNL), Q-switched ruby lasers (QSRL), Q-switched alexandrite lasers (QSAL), and picosecond alexandrite lasers (PSAL) in removing nevus of Ota. Inclusion criteria were nevus of Ota patients treated with QSNL, QSRL, QSAL, or PSAL and documentation of percent clearance and the rate of at least one adverse event. Articles in English, Chinese, or Japanese were included. The prespecified outcome measures were efficacy (percent clearance) and safety (rates of hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, scarring, and recurrence). The review included 57 studies and 13,417 patients. The pooled success rate was 64% for QSNL (95% CI 52–76%), 54% for QSRL (95% CI 39–69%), 58% for QSAL (95% CI 44–72%), and 100% for PSAL (95% CI 98–102%). The pooled adverse event rate was 5% for QSNL (95% CI 4–6%), 14% for QSRL (95% CI 9–19%), 9% for QSAL (95% CI 6–12%), and 44% (95% CI 31–57%) for PSAL. QSNL has the most evidence for effectively and safely treating nevus of Ota. PSAL potentially has a superior efficacy; however, further studies are needed to elucidate its side effect profile when treating nevus of Ota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLasers in medical science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Dermatology
  • Nevus of Ota
  • Picosecond lasers
  • Pigmented lesions
  • Q-switched lasers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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