Comparative impacts of Tai Chi, balance training, and a specially-designed yoga program on balance in older fallers

Meng Ni, Kiersten Mooney, Luca Richards, Anoop Balachandran, Mingwei Sun, Kysha Harriell, Melanie Potiaumpai, Joseph Signorile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To compare the effect of a custom-designed yoga program with 2 other balance training programs. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Research laboratory. Participants A group of older adults (N=39; mean age, 74.15±6.99y) with a history of falling. Interventions Three different exercise interventions (Tai Chi, standard balance training, yoga) were given for 12 weeks. Main Outcome Measures Balance performance was examined during pre- and posttest using field tests, including the 8-foot up-and-go test, 1-leg stance, functional reach, and usual and maximal walking speed. The static and dynamic balances were also assessed by postural sway and dynamic posturography, respectively. Results Training produced significant improvements in all field tests (P<.005), but group difference and time × group interaction were not detected. For postural sway, significant decreases in the area of the center of pressure with eyes open (P=.001) and eyes closed (P=.002) were detected after training. For eyes open, maximum medial-lateral velocity significantly decreased for the sample (P=.013). For eyes closed, medial-lateral displacement decreased for Tai Chi (P<.01). For dynamic posturography, significant improvements in overall score (P=.001), time on the test (P=.006), and 2 linear measures in lateral (P=.001) and anterior-posterior (P<.001) directions were seen for the sample. Conclusions Yoga was as effective as Tai Chi and standard balance training for improving postural stability and may offer an alternative to more traditional programs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume95
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Tai Ji
Yoga
Leg
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Pressure
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Comparative impacts of Tai Chi, balance training, and a specially-designed yoga program on balance in older fallers. / Ni, Meng; Mooney, Kiersten; Richards, Luca; Balachandran, Anoop; Sun, Mingwei; Harriell, Kysha; Potiaumpai, Melanie; Signorile, Joseph.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 95, No. 9, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ni, Meng ; Mooney, Kiersten ; Richards, Luca ; Balachandran, Anoop ; Sun, Mingwei ; Harriell, Kysha ; Potiaumpai, Melanie ; Signorile, Joseph. / Comparative impacts of Tai Chi, balance training, and a specially-designed yoga program on balance in older fallers. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 95, No. 9.
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