Comparative effectiveness of medication versus cognitive-behavioral therapy in a randomized controlled trial of low-income young minority women with depression

Juned Siddique, Joyce Y. Chung, C. Hendricks Brown, Jeanne Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether there are latent trajectory classes in response to treatment and whether they moderate the effects of medication versus psychotherapy. Method: Data come from a 1-year randomized controlled trial of 267 low-income, young (M = 29 years), minority (44% Black, 50% Latina, 6% White) women with current major depression randomized to antidepressants, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or referral to community mental health services. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether there were differential effects of medication versus CBT. Depression was measured via the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Hamilton, 1960). Results: We identified 2 latent trajectory classes. The first was characterized by severe depression at baseline. At 6 months, mean depression scores for the medication and CBT groups in this class were 13.9 and 14.9, respectively (difference not significant). At 12 months, mean depression scores were 16.4 and 11.0, respectively (p for difference =.04). The second class was characterized by moderate depression and anxiety at baseline. At 6 months, mean depression scores for the medication and CBT groups were 4.4 and 6.8, respectively (p for difference =.03). At 12 months, the mean depression scores were 7.1 and 7.8, respectively, and the difference was no longer significant. Conclusions: Among depressed women with moderate baseline depression and anxiety, medication was superior to CBT at 6 months, but the difference was not sustained at 1 year. Among women with severe depression, there was no significant treatment group difference at 6 months, but CBT was superior to medication at 1 year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)995-1006
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • buproprion
  • CBT
  • growth mixture model
  • paroxetine
  • personalized medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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