Comparative effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea

Scott B. Boyd, Arthur S. Walters, Yanna Song, Lily Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To directly compare the clinical effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) - performed alone and in combination - for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients and Methods: The investigators designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of patients with moderate to severe OSA (baseline AHI >15). The predictor variable was operative treatment and included MMA, UPPP, and UPPP followed by MMA (UPPP/MMA). The primary outcome variable was the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured preoperatively and 3 months to 6 months postoperatively. Other variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, respiratory, and sleep parameters. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Results: The sample was composed of 106 patients grouped as follows: MMA (n = 37), UPPP (n = 34), and UPPP/MMA (n = 35) for treatment of OSA. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups for the study variables at baseline, except for AHI. Surgical treatment resulted in a significant decrease in AHI in each group: MMA (baseline AHI, 56.3 ± 22.6 vs AHI after MMA, 11.4 ± 9.8; P < .0001), UPPP/MMA (baseline AHI, 55.7 ± 49.2 vs AHI after UPPP/MMA, 11.6 ± 10.7; P < .0001), and UPPP (baseline AHI, 41.8 ± 28.0 vs AHI after UPPP, 30.1 ± 27.5; P =.0057). After adjusting for differences in baseline AHI, the estimated mean change in AHI was significantly larger for MMA compared with UPPP (MMA AHI, -40.5 vs UPPP AHI, -19.4; P = <.0001). UPPP/MMA was no more effective than MMA (P =.684). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that MMA should be the surgical treatment option of choice for most patients with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to adequately adhere to CPAP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-751
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Apnea
Therapeutics
Sleep
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Comparative effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. / Boyd, Scott B.; Walters, Arthur S.; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 71, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 743-751.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To directly compare the clinical effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) - performed alone and in combination - for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients and Methods: The investigators designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of patients with moderate to severe OSA (baseline AHI >15). The predictor variable was operative treatment and included MMA, UPPP, and UPPP followed by MMA (UPPP/MMA). The primary outcome variable was the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured preoperatively and 3 months to 6 months postoperatively. Other variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, respiratory, and sleep parameters. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Results: The sample was composed of 106 patients grouped as follows: MMA (n = 37), UPPP (n = 34), and UPPP/MMA (n = 35) for treatment of OSA. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups for the study variables at baseline, except for AHI. Surgical treatment resulted in a significant decrease in AHI in each group: MMA (baseline AHI, 56.3 ± 22.6 vs AHI after MMA, 11.4 ± 9.8; P < .0001), UPPP/MMA (baseline AHI, 55.7 ± 49.2 vs AHI after UPPP/MMA, 11.6 ± 10.7; P < .0001), and UPPP (baseline AHI, 41.8 ± 28.0 vs AHI after UPPP, 30.1 ± 27.5; P =.0057). After adjusting for differences in baseline AHI, the estimated mean change in AHI was significantly larger for MMA compared with UPPP (MMA AHI, -40.5 vs UPPP AHI, -19.4; P = <.0001). UPPP/MMA was no more effective than MMA (P =.684). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that MMA should be the surgical treatment option of choice for most patients with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to adequately adhere to CPAP.",
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N2 - Purpose: To directly compare the clinical effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) - performed alone and in combination - for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients and Methods: The investigators designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of patients with moderate to severe OSA (baseline AHI >15). The predictor variable was operative treatment and included MMA, UPPP, and UPPP followed by MMA (UPPP/MMA). The primary outcome variable was the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured preoperatively and 3 months to 6 months postoperatively. Other variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, respiratory, and sleep parameters. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Results: The sample was composed of 106 patients grouped as follows: MMA (n = 37), UPPP (n = 34), and UPPP/MMA (n = 35) for treatment of OSA. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups for the study variables at baseline, except for AHI. Surgical treatment resulted in a significant decrease in AHI in each group: MMA (baseline AHI, 56.3 ± 22.6 vs AHI after MMA, 11.4 ± 9.8; P < .0001), UPPP/MMA (baseline AHI, 55.7 ± 49.2 vs AHI after UPPP/MMA, 11.6 ± 10.7; P < .0001), and UPPP (baseline AHI, 41.8 ± 28.0 vs AHI after UPPP, 30.1 ± 27.5; P =.0057). After adjusting for differences in baseline AHI, the estimated mean change in AHI was significantly larger for MMA compared with UPPP (MMA AHI, -40.5 vs UPPP AHI, -19.4; P = <.0001). UPPP/MMA was no more effective than MMA (P =.684). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that MMA should be the surgical treatment option of choice for most patients with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to adequately adhere to CPAP.

AB - Purpose: To directly compare the clinical effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) - performed alone and in combination - for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients and Methods: The investigators designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of patients with moderate to severe OSA (baseline AHI >15). The predictor variable was operative treatment and included MMA, UPPP, and UPPP followed by MMA (UPPP/MMA). The primary outcome variable was the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured preoperatively and 3 months to 6 months postoperatively. Other variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, respiratory, and sleep parameters. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Results: The sample was composed of 106 patients grouped as follows: MMA (n = 37), UPPP (n = 34), and UPPP/MMA (n = 35) for treatment of OSA. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups for the study variables at baseline, except for AHI. Surgical treatment resulted in a significant decrease in AHI in each group: MMA (baseline AHI, 56.3 ± 22.6 vs AHI after MMA, 11.4 ± 9.8; P < .0001), UPPP/MMA (baseline AHI, 55.7 ± 49.2 vs AHI after UPPP/MMA, 11.6 ± 10.7; P < .0001), and UPPP (baseline AHI, 41.8 ± 28.0 vs AHI after UPPP, 30.1 ± 27.5; P =.0057). After adjusting for differences in baseline AHI, the estimated mean change in AHI was significantly larger for MMA compared with UPPP (MMA AHI, -40.5 vs UPPP AHI, -19.4; P = <.0001). UPPP/MMA was no more effective than MMA (P =.684). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that MMA should be the surgical treatment option of choice for most patients with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to adequately adhere to CPAP.

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