Comparative advertising effectiveness: The role of involvement and source credibility

Jerry B. Gotlieb, Dan Sarel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research on the persuasive impact of comparative advertising has produced inconsistent results. Consequently, researchers have suggested lack of credibility and the need for higherinvolvement as two problems which might impede the persuasive impact of comparative advertising. However, virtually no empirical evidence comparing the effects of comparative advertising to non-comparative advertising when different levels of involvement are activatedexists. In addition, little research has examined whether source credibility enhances the persuasive impact of comparative advertising. Attribution theory provided the framework for theexperiment reported in this paper. Experimental results suggest that when higher involvementis activated and a source of higher credibility is included in the advertisements, comparativeadvertising for a new brand has a more positive effect on purchase intentions than noncomparative advertising.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-45
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Advertising
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1991

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comparative advertising
advertising effectiveness
credibility
Marketing
attribution theory
purchase
Advertising effectiveness
Comparative advertising
Source credibility
lack
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Communication
  • Marketing

Cite this

Comparative advertising effectiveness : The role of involvement and source credibility. / Gotlieb, Jerry B.; Sarel, Dan.

In: Journal of Advertising, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.03.1991, p. 38-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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