Companion diagnostic testing for targeted cancer therapies: An overview

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genes and their products involved in the biological pathways of human cancers have been studied as either targets of new therapies, or predictive markers for the sensitivity of or resistance to the therapies. Companion diagnostic testing on biological markers for targeted cancer therapies has become a vital component of personalized cancer treatment. This article provides an overview on the biological pathways and biomarkers, including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, ROS1, HER2, and KIT for targeted treatment of lung, gastrointestinal, colorectal, and breast cancers as well as malignant melanoma. The current testing approach appears to focus on single biomarkers. However, a comprehensive approach that includes testing multimarkers involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways may become more desirable for some cancers, because of therapy resistance that can be caused by mutations in different genes and the availability of new therapies that may aim at multiple targets in the pathways. Only a few companion diagnostic kits have been approved by FDA, and the use of an FDA approved kit for some biomarkers, such as BRAF and KRAS, can be controversial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-523
Number of pages9
JournalGenetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Neoplasms
MAP Kinase Kinase 3
Therapeutics
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase
Sirolimus
Genes
Colorectal Neoplasms
Melanoma
Lung Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Companion diagnostic testing for targeted cancer therapies : An overview. / Fan, Yao-Shan.

In: Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, Vol. 17, No. 7, 01.07.2013, p. 515-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ed1dc9faa2d94ba49ca2ddb100287771,
title = "Companion diagnostic testing for targeted cancer therapies: An overview",
abstract = "Genes and their products involved in the biological pathways of human cancers have been studied as either targets of new therapies, or predictive markers for the sensitivity of or resistance to the therapies. Companion diagnostic testing on biological markers for targeted cancer therapies has become a vital component of personalized cancer treatment. This article provides an overview on the biological pathways and biomarkers, including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, ROS1, HER2, and KIT for targeted treatment of lung, gastrointestinal, colorectal, and breast cancers as well as malignant melanoma. The current testing approach appears to focus on single biomarkers. However, a comprehensive approach that includes testing multimarkers involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways may become more desirable for some cancers, because of therapy resistance that can be caused by mutations in different genes and the availability of new therapies that may aim at multiple targets in the pathways. Only a few companion diagnostic kits have been approved by FDA, and the use of an FDA approved kit for some biomarkers, such as BRAF and KRAS, can be controversial.",
author = "Yao-Shan Fan",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/gtmb.2012.0510",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "515--523",
journal = "Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers",
issn = "1945-0265",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Companion diagnostic testing for targeted cancer therapies

T2 - An overview

AU - Fan, Yao-Shan

PY - 2013/7/1

Y1 - 2013/7/1

N2 - Genes and their products involved in the biological pathways of human cancers have been studied as either targets of new therapies, or predictive markers for the sensitivity of or resistance to the therapies. Companion diagnostic testing on biological markers for targeted cancer therapies has become a vital component of personalized cancer treatment. This article provides an overview on the biological pathways and biomarkers, including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, ROS1, HER2, and KIT for targeted treatment of lung, gastrointestinal, colorectal, and breast cancers as well as malignant melanoma. The current testing approach appears to focus on single biomarkers. However, a comprehensive approach that includes testing multimarkers involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways may become more desirable for some cancers, because of therapy resistance that can be caused by mutations in different genes and the availability of new therapies that may aim at multiple targets in the pathways. Only a few companion diagnostic kits have been approved by FDA, and the use of an FDA approved kit for some biomarkers, such as BRAF and KRAS, can be controversial.

AB - Genes and their products involved in the biological pathways of human cancers have been studied as either targets of new therapies, or predictive markers for the sensitivity of or resistance to the therapies. Companion diagnostic testing on biological markers for targeted cancer therapies has become a vital component of personalized cancer treatment. This article provides an overview on the biological pathways and biomarkers, including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, ROS1, HER2, and KIT for targeted treatment of lung, gastrointestinal, colorectal, and breast cancers as well as malignant melanoma. The current testing approach appears to focus on single biomarkers. However, a comprehensive approach that includes testing multimarkers involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways may become more desirable for some cancers, because of therapy resistance that can be caused by mutations in different genes and the availability of new therapies that may aim at multiple targets in the pathways. Only a few companion diagnostic kits have been approved by FDA, and the use of an FDA approved kit for some biomarkers, such as BRAF and KRAS, can be controversial.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879912933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879912933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/gtmb.2012.0510

DO - 10.1089/gtmb.2012.0510

M3 - Article

C2 - 23574530

AN - SCOPUS:84879912933

VL - 17

SP - 515

EP - 523

JO - Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers

JF - Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers

SN - 1945-0265

IS - 7

ER -