Commentary on "parental attitudes toward fertility preservation in boys with cancer: Context of different risk levels of infertility and success rates of fertility restoration,"

Thomas W. McLean, Hooman Sadri-Ardekani, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

Cancer survival rates have increased dramatically in recent decades. Until better cancer therapies emerge, infertility will remain a common side effect of cancer therapy. Infertility therapies have likewise flourished in recent decades, but unfortunately the science of infertility has been relatively slow to infiltrate the oncology world. Parents of children with cancer are interested in preventing and/or preserving their children's fertility. But do they know what their options are? Do they even know infertility is a risk? The answer to both, sadly, is often no. However, now that we know the majority of parents would agree to fertility preservation techniques, we may confidently proceed with appropriate clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUroToday International Journal
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 29 2013

Keywords

  • Cancer survival
  • Fertility preservation
  • Pediatric cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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