Comment on "Oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O) of hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarkers in plants, soils and sediments as paleoclimate proxy I: Insight from a climate chamber experiment" by Zech et al. (2014)

Leonel Sternberg

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Zech et al. (2014) reported oxygen isotope ratios of stem hemicellulose for three species of plants grown at different temperatures and humidity. The authors did not consider temperature effects on biochemical fractionation during hemicellulose synthesis as an important determinant of the oxygen isotope ratio of hemicellulose. However, a closer examination of their data shows that, indeed, temperature has a significant effect on the oxygen isotope biochemical fractionation. Lower temperature has no effect on the proportion of oxygen isotope exchange with cell water, but it increases the biochemical fractionation of the exchange reaction. These results are consistent with previous observations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-679
Number of pages3
JournalGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Volume141
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2014

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Oxygen Isotopes
oxygen isotope ratio
Biomarkers
paleoclimate
Sugars
biomarker
sugar
Sediments
Fractionation
fractionation
Soils
oxygen isotope
climate
sediment
soil
experiment
Experiments
temperature effect
humidity
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

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abstract = "Zech et al. (2014) reported oxygen isotope ratios of stem hemicellulose for three species of plants grown at different temperatures and humidity. The authors did not consider temperature effects on biochemical fractionation during hemicellulose synthesis as an important determinant of the oxygen isotope ratio of hemicellulose. However, a closer examination of their data shows that, indeed, temperature has a significant effect on the oxygen isotope biochemical fractionation. Lower temperature has no effect on the proportion of oxygen isotope exchange with cell water, but it increases the biochemical fractionation of the exchange reaction. These results are consistent with previous observations.",
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AB - Zech et al. (2014) reported oxygen isotope ratios of stem hemicellulose for three species of plants grown at different temperatures and humidity. The authors did not consider temperature effects on biochemical fractionation during hemicellulose synthesis as an important determinant of the oxygen isotope ratio of hemicellulose. However, a closer examination of their data shows that, indeed, temperature has a significant effect on the oxygen isotope biochemical fractionation. Lower temperature has no effect on the proportion of oxygen isotope exchange with cell water, but it increases the biochemical fractionation of the exchange reaction. These results are consistent with previous observations.

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