Combined effects of oil exposure, temperature and ultraviolet radiation on buoyancy and oxygen consumption of embryonic mahi-mahi, Coryphaena hippurus

Christina Pasparakis, Lauren E. Sweet, John Stieglitz, Daniel D Benetti, Conrad T. Casente, Aaron P. Roberts, Martin Grosell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the summer of 2010 and coincided with the spawning window of the ecologically and economically important pelagic fish mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). During summer months, early life stage mahi-mahi were likely also exposed to other naturally occurring stressors such as increased temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UV). Previous research has shown that co-exposure to oil and additional natural stressors can affect the timing and duration of negative buoyancy in mahi-mahi embryos. The current study aimed to elucidate the factors affecting the onset of negative buoyancy and to also explore possible mechanisms behind buoyancy change. Embryos co-exposed to oil and/or increased temperature and UV radiation displayed early onset of negative buoyancy with concurrent increases in oxygen consumption and sinking rates, which are normally only seen during the period directly preceding hatch. Results also suggest a behavioral response in which embryos avoid UV radiation by sinking down the water column but reestablish positive buoyancy once the UV radiation is removed. These findings imply that embryos can dynamically change their position in the water column in response to external cues and thus may have much greater control over buoyancy than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-121
Number of pages9
JournalAquatic Toxicology
Volume191
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • Buoyancy
  • Metabolic rate
  • Multiple stressors
  • Oil spill
  • Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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