Collaboration and practice patterns among urologists and gynecologists in the treatment of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse: A survey of the International Continence Society members

Shahar Madjar, Deena Evans, Robert C. Duncan, Angelo E. Gousse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both urologists and gynecologists are involved in the care of women with urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic floor prolapse (PFP). This study was designed to examine the differences among urologists and gynecologists who treat UI and PFP, and to characterize the collaboration between them. A 14-question survey was mailed to the International Continence Society (ICS) members who are urologists or gynecologists. Questions dealt with professional training, type of practice, volume of UI and PFP procedures, preferred procedures for various types of UI and PFP, and the type and extent of collaboration. Of the 666 urologists and gynecologists to whom the questionnaire was sent, 229 responded (34.4% response rate). Among them, 63.7% were urologists and 36.2% were gynecologists. Collaboration in the operating room was reported by 140 responders (50.7%) and was significantly correlated with the specialty, and with the country of practice, with P values of 0.004, and 0.004, respectively. Collaboration in the operating room was reported mainly in procedures for the correction of vaginal vault prolapse or enterocele, and hysterectomy. It was not statistically correlated with the time dedicated to UI and PFP, the volume of surgeries performed, UI and PFP fellowship training, university hospital affiliation, and years in practice. Reasons for not collaborating in the operating room included familiarity with all or most of the anti-incontinence and pelvic floor reconstruction procedures (44.5%), unavailability of the other professional (6.1%), and reimbursement problems (3.1%).%While urologists and gynecologists do collaborate extensively in clinical research and diagnosis of challenging cases, surgical collaboration is limited to procedures traditionally performed by gynecologists. Future training programs exposing trainees to both fields of expertise may enable better ground for collaboration and improved care for women with UI and PFP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Female urology
  • Gynecology
  • Pelvic floor prolapse
  • Urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Nephrology
  • Urology

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