Cognitive rehabilitation of mildly impaired Alzheimer disease patients on cholinesterase inhibitors

David Loewenstein, Amarilis Acevedo, Sara J Czaja, Ranjan Duara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The authors evaluated the efficacy of a new cognitive rehabilitation program on memory and functional performance of mildly impaired Alzheimer disease (AD) patients receiving a cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Twenty-five participants in the Cognitive Rehabilitation (CR) condition participated in two 45-minute sessions twice per week for 24 total sessions. CR training included face-name association tasks, object recall training, functional tasks (e.g., making change, paying bills), orientation to time and place, visuo-motor speed of processing, and the use of a memory notebook. Nineteen participants in the Mental Stimulation (MS) condition had equivalent therapist contact and number of sessions, which consisted of interactive computer games involving memory, concentration, and problem-solving skills. Results: Compared with the MS condition, participants in CR demonstrated improvedperformance on tasks that were similar to those used in training. Gains in recall of face-name associations, orientation, cognitive processing speed, and specific functional tasks were present post-intervention and at a 3-month follow-up. Conclusion: A systematic program of cognitive rehabilitation can result in maintained improvement in performance on specific cognitive and functional tasks in mildly impaired AD patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-402
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Alzheimer Disease
Rehabilitation
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Video Games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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Cognitive rehabilitation of mildly impaired Alzheimer disease patients on cholinesterase inhibitors. / Loewenstein, David; Acevedo, Amarilis; Czaja, Sara J; Duara, Ranjan.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 395-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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