Cognitive Function in Asymptomatic HIV-1 Infection: The Effects of Age, Education, Ethnicity, and Depression

Bonnie E. Levin, Joseph R. Berger, Toni Didona, Robert C. Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether individuals with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection exhibit subtle cognitive deficits relative to healthy seronegative control subjects. Asymptomatic seropositive homosexual and bisexual men were compared with 59 seronegative homosexual men on a battery of neuropsychological tests. Age, education, ethnicity, and depression were controlled as potential confounding variables. Seropositive subjects performed below seronegative controls on measures of verbal fluency, recall of logical discourse material (younger seropositive subjects only), and arithmetic. No group differences were found on visuospatial measures, abstract reasoning, attention, or set shifting. Ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic) and education effects were observed only on select language measures. Depression did not adversely affect performance scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-313
Number of pages11
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1992

Keywords

  • age
  • cognitive deficit
  • depression
  • education
  • ethnicity
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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