Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Usual Clinical Care for Youth Depression: An Initial Test of Transportability to Community Clinics and Clinicians

John R. Weisz, Michael A. Southam-Gerow, Elana B. Gordis, Jennifer K. Connor-Smith, Brian C. Chu, David A. Langer, Bryce D. McLeod, Amanda Doss, Alanna Updegraff, Bahr Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community clinic therapists were randomized to (a) brief training and supervision in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth depression or (b) usual care (UC). The therapists treated 57 youths (56% girls), ages 8-15, of whom 33% were Caucasian, 26% were African American, and 26% were Latino/Latina. Most youths were from low-income families and all had Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) depressive disorders (plus multiple comorbidities). All youths were randomized to CBT or UC and treated until normal termination. Session coding showed more use of CBT by CBT therapists and more psychodynamic and family approaches by UC therapists. At posttreatment, depression symptom measures were at subclinical levels, and 75% of youths had no remaining depressive disorder, but CBT and UC groups did not differ on these outcomes. However, compared with UC, CBT was (a) briefer (24 vs. 39 weeks), (b) superior in parent-rated therapeutic alliance, (c) less likely to require additional services (including all psychotropics combined and depression medication in particular), and (d) less costly. The findings showed advantages for CBT in parent engagement, reduced use of medication and other services, overall cost, and possibly speed of improvement-a hypothesis that warrants testing in future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-396
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume77
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Cognitive Therapy
Depression
Depressive Disorder
Hispanic Americans
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
African Americans
Comorbidity
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • children
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • depression
  • youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Usual Clinical Care for Youth Depression : An Initial Test of Transportability to Community Clinics and Clinicians. / Weisz, John R.; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Gordis, Elana B.; Connor-Smith, Jennifer K.; Chu, Brian C.; Langer, David A.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Doss, Amanda; Updegraff, Alanna; Weiss, Bahr.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 77, No. 3, 01.06.2009, p. 383-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weisz, JR, Southam-Gerow, MA, Gordis, EB, Connor-Smith, JK, Chu, BC, Langer, DA, McLeod, BD, Doss, A, Updegraff, A & Weiss, B 2009, 'Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Usual Clinical Care for Youth Depression: An Initial Test of Transportability to Community Clinics and Clinicians', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 383-396. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0013877
Weisz, John R. ; Southam-Gerow, Michael A. ; Gordis, Elana B. ; Connor-Smith, Jennifer K. ; Chu, Brian C. ; Langer, David A. ; McLeod, Bryce D. ; Doss, Amanda ; Updegraff, Alanna ; Weiss, Bahr. / Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Usual Clinical Care for Youth Depression : An Initial Test of Transportability to Community Clinics and Clinicians. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 77, No. 3. pp. 383-396.
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