Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care (CBT-BISC) Among Sexual Minority Men Living with HIV: Skills-Based Treatment Mediators

Patrycja Klimek, Sabine Wilhelm, Steven A. Safren, Aaron J. Blashill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Individuals develop coping skills in response to body image distress; however, the degree to which body image improvements are mediated by skill acquisition is unknown. The current study assessed skills-based mediators of CBT-BISC (n = 22) versus enhanced treatment-as-usual (n = 22) for sexual minority men with HIV and body image disturbance. Skills-based mediators included avoidance, appearance fixing, and acceptance and cognitive reappraisal. Results revealed that CBT-BISC significantly reduced body image disturbance and improved coping skills. Latent difference score mediation indicated that changes in acceptance and cognitive reappraisal significantly predicted body image disturbance changes (b = −.96, p =.001). These strategies may, therefore, have a unique role in reducing body image disturbance in sexual minority men with HIV. Clinicians may wish to prioritize these strategies in CBT-BISC. Future treatment research, with methodologically rigorous mediation designs, is needed to assess mechanisms of change and consequently improve efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-215
Number of pages8
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Coping
  • HIV
  • Sexual minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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