Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care (CBT-BISC) in Sexual Minority Men Living With HIV: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Aaron J. Blashill, Steven Safren, Sabine Wilhelm, Jonathan Jampel, S. Wade Taylor, Conall O'Cleirigh, Kenneth H. Mayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Body image disturbance is a distressing and interfering problem among many sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with elevated depressive symptoms and poor HIV self-care (e.g., antiretroviral therapy [ART] nonadherence). The current study tested the preliminary efficacy of a newly created intervention: cognitive-behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) for this population. Method: The current study entailed a 2-arm randomized controlled trial (N = 44) comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition. Analyses were conducted at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The primary outcome was body image disturbance (BDD-YBOCS), and secondary outcomes were ART adherence (electronically monitored via Wisepill), depressive symptoms (MADRS), and global functioning (GAF). Results: At 3 months, the CBT-BISC condition showed substantial improvement in BDD-YBOCS (b = -13.6, SE = 2.7, 95% CI [-19.0, -8.3], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.39); MADRS (b = -4.9, SE = 2.8, 95% CI [-10.6, .70], p = .086; dppc2 = .87); ART adherence (b = 8.8, SE = 3.3, 95% CI [2.0, 15.6], p = .01; dppc2 = .94); and GAF (b = 12.3, SE = 3.2, 95% CI [6.1, 18.6], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.91) compared with the ETAU condition. Results were generally maintained, or improved, at 6 months; although, adherence findings were mixed depending on the calculation method. Conclusions: CBT-BISC shows preliminary efficacy in the integrated treatment of body image disturbance and HIV self-care behaviors among sexual minority men living with HIV. (PsycINFO Database Record

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 25 2017

Fingerprint

Body Image
Cognitive Therapy
Self Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Depression
Therapeutics
Sexual Minorities
Population

Keywords

  • ART
  • Body image
  • HIV
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care (CBT-BISC) in Sexual Minority Men Living With HIV : A Randomized Controlled Trial. / Blashill, Aaron J.; Safren, Steven; Wilhelm, Sabine; Jampel, Jonathan; Taylor, S. Wade; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H.

In: Health Psychology, 25.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blashill, Aaron J. ; Safren, Steven ; Wilhelm, Sabine ; Jampel, Jonathan ; Taylor, S. Wade ; O'Cleirigh, Conall ; Mayer, Kenneth H. / Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care (CBT-BISC) in Sexual Minority Men Living With HIV : A Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Health Psychology. 2017.
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abstract = "Objective: Body image disturbance is a distressing and interfering problem among many sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with elevated depressive symptoms and poor HIV self-care (e.g., antiretroviral therapy [ART] nonadherence). The current study tested the preliminary efficacy of a newly created intervention: cognitive-behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) for this population. Method: The current study entailed a 2-arm randomized controlled trial (N = 44) comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition. Analyses were conducted at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The primary outcome was body image disturbance (BDD-YBOCS), and secondary outcomes were ART adherence (electronically monitored via Wisepill), depressive symptoms (MADRS), and global functioning (GAF). Results: At 3 months, the CBT-BISC condition showed substantial improvement in BDD-YBOCS (b = -13.6, SE = 2.7, 95{\%} CI [-19.0, -8.3], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.39); MADRS (b = -4.9, SE = 2.8, 95{\%} CI [-10.6, .70], p = .086; dppc2 = .87); ART adherence (b = 8.8, SE = 3.3, 95{\%} CI [2.0, 15.6], p = .01; dppc2 = .94); and GAF (b = 12.3, SE = 3.2, 95{\%} CI [6.1, 18.6], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.91) compared with the ETAU condition. Results were generally maintained, or improved, at 6 months; although, adherence findings were mixed depending on the calculation method. Conclusions: CBT-BISC shows preliminary efficacy in the integrated treatment of body image disturbance and HIV self-care behaviors among sexual minority men living with HIV. (PsycINFO Database Record",
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AU - Wilhelm, Sabine

AU - Jampel, Jonathan

AU - Taylor, S. Wade

AU - O'Cleirigh, Conall

AU - Mayer, Kenneth H.

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N2 - Objective: Body image disturbance is a distressing and interfering problem among many sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with elevated depressive symptoms and poor HIV self-care (e.g., antiretroviral therapy [ART] nonadherence). The current study tested the preliminary efficacy of a newly created intervention: cognitive-behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) for this population. Method: The current study entailed a 2-arm randomized controlled trial (N = 44) comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition. Analyses were conducted at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The primary outcome was body image disturbance (BDD-YBOCS), and secondary outcomes were ART adherence (electronically monitored via Wisepill), depressive symptoms (MADRS), and global functioning (GAF). Results: At 3 months, the CBT-BISC condition showed substantial improvement in BDD-YBOCS (b = -13.6, SE = 2.7, 95% CI [-19.0, -8.3], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.39); MADRS (b = -4.9, SE = 2.8, 95% CI [-10.6, .70], p = .086; dppc2 = .87); ART adherence (b = 8.8, SE = 3.3, 95% CI [2.0, 15.6], p = .01; dppc2 = .94); and GAF (b = 12.3, SE = 3.2, 95% CI [6.1, 18.6], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.91) compared with the ETAU condition. Results were generally maintained, or improved, at 6 months; although, adherence findings were mixed depending on the calculation method. Conclusions: CBT-BISC shows preliminary efficacy in the integrated treatment of body image disturbance and HIV self-care behaviors among sexual minority men living with HIV. (PsycINFO Database Record

AB - Objective: Body image disturbance is a distressing and interfering problem among many sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with elevated depressive symptoms and poor HIV self-care (e.g., antiretroviral therapy [ART] nonadherence). The current study tested the preliminary efficacy of a newly created intervention: cognitive-behavioral therapy for body image and self-care (CBT-BISC) for this population. Method: The current study entailed a 2-arm randomized controlled trial (N = 44) comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition. Analyses were conducted at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The primary outcome was body image disturbance (BDD-YBOCS), and secondary outcomes were ART adherence (electronically monitored via Wisepill), depressive symptoms (MADRS), and global functioning (GAF). Results: At 3 months, the CBT-BISC condition showed substantial improvement in BDD-YBOCS (b = -13.6, SE = 2.7, 95% CI [-19.0, -8.3], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.39); MADRS (b = -4.9, SE = 2.8, 95% CI [-10.6, .70], p = .086; dppc2 = .87); ART adherence (b = 8.8, SE = 3.3, 95% CI [2.0, 15.6], p = .01; dppc2 = .94); and GAF (b = 12.3, SE = 3.2, 95% CI [6.1, 18.6], p < .001; dppc2 = 2.91) compared with the ETAU condition. Results were generally maintained, or improved, at 6 months; although, adherence findings were mixed depending on the calculation method. Conclusions: CBT-BISC shows preliminary efficacy in the integrated treatment of body image disturbance and HIV self-care behaviors among sexual minority men living with HIV. (PsycINFO Database Record

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