Cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in HIV-infected injection drug users: A randomized controlled trial

Steven Safren, Conall M. O'Cleirigh, Jacqueline R. Bullis, Michael W. Otto, Michael D. Stein, Mark H. Pollack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Depression and substance use, the most common comorbidities with HIV, are both associated with poor treatment adherence. Injection drug users comprise a substantial portion of individuals with HIV in the United States and globally. The present study tested cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in patients with HIV and depression in active substance abuse treatment for injection drug use. Method: This is a 2-arm, randomized controlled trial (N = 89) comparing CBT-AD with enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU). Analyses were conducted for two time-frames: (a) baseline to post-treatment and (b) post-treatment to follow-up at 3 and 6 months after intervention discontinuation. Results: At post-treatment, the CBT-AD condition showed significantly greater improvement than ETAU in MEMS (electronic pill cap) based adherence, γslope = 0.8873, t(86) = 2.38, p =.02; dGMA-raw = 0.64, and depression, assessed by blinded assessor: Mongomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, F(1, 79) = 6.52, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-415
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Drug Users
Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Depression
Injections
Therapeutics
Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems
Drugs
Therapy
Adherence
Randomized Controlled Trial
AIDS/HIV
Substance-Related Disorders
Comorbidity
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • adherence
  • antiretroviral therapy (ART)
  • depression
  • HIV/AIDS
  • substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in HIV-infected injection drug users : A randomized controlled trial. / Safren, Steven; O'Cleirigh, Conall M.; Bullis, Jacqueline R.; Otto, Michael W.; Stein, Michael D.; Pollack, Mark H.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 80, No. 3, 06.2012, p. 404-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safren, Steven ; O'Cleirigh, Conall M. ; Bullis, Jacqueline R. ; Otto, Michael W. ; Stein, Michael D. ; Pollack, Mark H. / Cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in HIV-infected injection drug users : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 80, No. 3. pp. 404-415.
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