Cognitive-behavioral stress management increases free testosterone and decreases psychological distress in HIV-seropositive men

Dean G. Cruess, Michael H. Antoni, Neil Schneiderman, Gail Ironson, Philip McCabe, Jesus B. Fernandez, Stacy E. Cruess, Nancy Klimas, Mahendra Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of a 10-week group-based cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on psychological distress and plasma free testosterone in symptomatic, HIV-seropositive men were examined. Participants were randomized to either CBSM (n = 42) or a wait-list control group (n = 23). Men in the CBSM intervention showed significant increases in testosterone, whereas control participants showed significant decreases. Those participating in CBSM had significant distress reductions, whereas controls showed no such change. Alterations in free testosterone were inversely related to changes in distress states over time, independent of any changes in cortisol. These findings demonstrate that a short-term CBSM intervention increases free testosterone levels among symptomatic, HIV-seropositive men, and alterations in free testosterone are associated with changes in psychological distress observed during CBSM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-20
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral stress management
  • Free testosterone
  • HIV
  • Psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

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