Cognitive-behavioral stress management decreases dysphoric mood and herpes simplex virus-type 2 antibody titers in symptomatic HIV-seropositive gay men

Susan K. Lutgendorf, Michael H. Antoni, Gail Ironson, Nancy Klimas, Mahendra Kumar, Kathleen Starr, Philip McCabe, Karen Cleven, Mary Ann Fletcher, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the effects of a 10-week group cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on mood and immunologic parameters in HIV-seropositive gay men whose disease had progressed to a symptomatic stage. Men were randomized to either CBSM or a modified waiting list control group. The CBSM intervention significantly decreased self-reported dysphoria, anxiety, and total distress. Individuals who practiced relaxation more consistently had significantly greater drops in dysphoria. The intervention also decreased herpes simplex virus-Type 2 (HSV-2) immunoglobulin G antibody titers. The control group showed no significant changes in either mood or antibody titers. Individual difference analyses revealed that decreases in dysphoria significantly predicted lower HSV-2 antibody titers by the end of the 10-week period. Neither group displayed changes in HSV-Type 1 antibody titers or in CD4+ or CD8+ cell numbers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-43
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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