Cognitive-behavioral stress management buffers decreases in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and increases in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio and reduces mood disturbance and perceived stress among HIV- seropositive men

Dean G. Cruess, Michael H Antoni, Mahendra Kumar, Gail Ironson, Philip McCabe, Jesus B. Fernandez, Maryann Fletcher, Neil Schneiderman

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85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of a 10-week cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) levels and the ratio of cortisol to DHEA-S (cortisol/DHEA-S), potential surrogate adrenal markers of HIV disease progression, in relation to alterations in mood and distress. HIV-seropositive men were randomized to either a group-based CBSM intervention (n = 43) or to a wait-list control group (n= 24), with both hormonal and distress measures assessed just prior to and immediately following the 10-week period. Results showed that CBSM buffers decreases in DHEA-S and increases in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio. Further examination also revealed that changes in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio were significantly and positively related to changes in total mood disturbance and perceived stress over time. These findings demonstrate that a short-term CBSM intervention can buffer against decrements in DHEA-S and increments in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio among symptomatic, HIV-positive men, and that alterations in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio move in concert with changes in mood and distress observed during CBSM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-549
Number of pages13
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Hydrocortisone
Buffers
HIV
Disease Progression
Biomarkers
Control Groups

Keywords

  • CBSM
  • Cortisol/DHEA-S ratio
  • DHEA-S
  • HIV
  • Mood
  • Perceived stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Cognitive-behavioral stress management buffers decreases in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and increases in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio and reduces mood disturbance and perceived stress among HIV- seropositive men",
abstract = "This study examined the effects of a 10-week cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) levels and the ratio of cortisol to DHEA-S (cortisol/DHEA-S), potential surrogate adrenal markers of HIV disease progression, in relation to alterations in mood and distress. HIV-seropositive men were randomized to either a group-based CBSM intervention (n = 43) or to a wait-list control group (n= 24), with both hormonal and distress measures assessed just prior to and immediately following the 10-week period. Results showed that CBSM buffers decreases in DHEA-S and increases in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio. Further examination also revealed that changes in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio were significantly and positively related to changes in total mood disturbance and perceived stress over time. These findings demonstrate that a short-term CBSM intervention can buffer against decrements in DHEA-S and increments in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio among symptomatic, HIV-positive men, and that alterations in the cortisol/DHEA-S ratio move in concert with changes in mood and distress observed during CBSM.",
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AU - Antoni, Michael H

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AU - Ironson, Gail

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AU - Fernandez, Jesus B.

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