Cognitive behavioral principles within group mentoring: A randomized pilot study

Jason F Jent, Larissa N. Niec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group mentoring significantly increased children's reported social problem-solving skills and decreased parent-reported child externalizing and internalizing behavior problems after controlling for other concurrent mental health services. Attrition from the group mentoring program was notably low (7%) for children. The integration of a cognitive behavioral group mentoring program into children's existing community mental health services may result in additional reductions in externalizing and internalizing behavior problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-219
Number of pages17
JournalChild and Family Behavior Therapy
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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mentoring
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Community Mental Health Services
Community Mental Health Centers
social problem
Social Problems
Mental Health Services
community
Mentoring
parents
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Children
  • Emotional and behavioral problems
  • Group mentoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Cognitive behavioral principles within group mentoring : A randomized pilot study. / Jent, Jason F; Niec, Larissa N.

In: Child and Family Behavior Therapy, Vol. 31, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 203-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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