Cognitive analysis of contraceptive behavior.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cognitive approach emphasizing the role of memory structure and information processing has particular utility for explaining why teenage and adult women risk unwanted pregnancy. The ability to anticipate and prepare for sexual intercourse is contingent on the ability to think about sexual intercourse, contraception, and the negative impact on one's life of an unplanned pregnancy. Thus, actual risk taking or risk avoidance can be conceptualized as a function of the thoughts in a woman's mind as she is presented with the opportunity to engage in intercourse. 2 classes of factors are thought to influence the accessibility of memory structures in intimate situations: 1) situational factors, such as alcohol or the partner, that make it difficult for the woman to think clearly or broadly about her behavior and its consequences; and 2) external factors such as the sex and contraceptive experiences of self and others, education and career goals, relationship goals, and culture. Also significant is the contribution of spreading activation and the importance of pre-existing associations between various memory structures. Factors hypothesized to increase the accessibility of concepts relevant to the impact of an unwanted pregnancy include: partner's concerns about a pregnancy; goals, outcomes, social status, relationships, opportunities, and experiences that would be threatened by an unwanted pregnancy; experiences and involvement in activities relevant to valued goals; and observation of the negative impact of unwanted pregnancy on others. Research is in progress to assess predictions for contraceptive behavior based on this cognitive model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalImage--the journal of nursing scholarship
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contraception Behavior
Unwanted Pregnancies
Aptitude
Coitus
Unplanned Pregnancy
Ego
Contraceptive Agents
Risk-Taking
Contraception
Automatic Data Processing
Alcohols
Observation
Education
Pregnancy
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cognitive analysis of contraceptive behavior. / Norris, Anne E.

In: Image--the journal of nursing scholarship, Vol. 20, No. 3, 09.1988, p. 135-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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