Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history

D. S. Caruana, B. Weinbach, D. Goerg, L. B. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We treated 50 patients who ingested packets of cocaine and developed a protocol for conservative medical management. Of the 50 patients, only 3 required emergency surgery. Surgery was precipitated by signs and symptoms of bowel obstruction in all cases. Six patients chose elective surgery. The rest of the patients passed the packets without signs of cocaine toxicity or other complications. This finding is in contrast to that of previous reports. Asymptomatic patients who have ingested packets of cocaine can be safely observed and managed conservatively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-74
Number of pages2
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume100
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Natural History
Cocaine
Eating
Signs and Symptoms
Emergencies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Caruana, D. S., Weinbach, B., Goerg, D., & Gardner, L. B. (1984). Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history. Annals of Internal Medicine, 100(1), 73-74.

Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history. / Caruana, D. S.; Weinbach, B.; Goerg, D.; Gardner, L. B.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 100, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 73-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caruana, DS, Weinbach, B, Goerg, D & Gardner, LB 1984, 'Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 100, no. 1, pp. 73-74.
Caruana DS, Weinbach B, Goerg D, Gardner LB. Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1984 Jan 1;100(1):73-74.
Caruana, D. S. ; Weinbach, B. ; Goerg, D. ; Gardner, L. B. / Cocaine-packet ingestion. Diagnosis, management, and natural history. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 73-74.
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