Coaches' and athletes' perceptions of efficacy-enhancing techniques

Tiffanye M. Vargas-Tonsing, Nicholas D. Myers, Deborah L. Feltz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research has offered insight into coaches' perceptions of various efficacy-enhancing techniques but not athletes' perceptions of their coaches' techniques. The purpose of the present research was to compare coaches' and athletes' perceptions of efficacy enhancing techniques. Male (n = 29) and female (n = 49) baseball, basketball, softball, and soccer coaches and teams were surveyed from Division II and III collegiate programs. Results found that the strategies that coaches perceived they used most, as well as were the most effective, were instruction-drilling, acting confident themselves, and encouraging positive talk. Athletes had similar perceptions to their coaches regarding coaches' use and effectiveness of efficacy techniques. However, closer examination revealed coaches' and athletes' mean perceptions of these techniques to vary among levels of congruence and incongruence. Exploratory analyses were also conducted on coaches' and athletes' perceptions by gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-414
Number of pages18
JournalSport Psychologist
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Coaches' and athletes' perceptions of efficacy-enhancing techniques'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this