Cloture reform and party government in the senate, 1918-1925

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why does filibustering persist in the U.S. Senate? This article analyzes senators' preferences toward majority cloture from 1918 to 1925, a crucial period in Senate history. I find that majority party members were more likely to support stricter cloture rules, but support for cloture reform diminished within both parties for senators far from the party median. I find little evidence that support or opposition to cloture reform was linked to seniority, prior House experience, legislative activism, or state size. These findings are consistent with the micro-level claims of conditional party government theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-719
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Politics
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

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senate
party member
reform
micro level
opposition
history
evidence
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Cloture reform and party government in the senate, 1918-1925. / Koger, John G.

In: Journal of Politics, Vol. 68, No. 3, 08.2006, p. 708-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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