Clinical trials in mild traumatic brain injury

Michael E Hoffer, Mikhaylo Szczupak, Carey Balaban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Traumatic brain injury is an increasingly prevalent injury seen in both civilian and military populations. Regardless of the mechanisms of injury, the most common sub-type of injury continues to be mild traumatic brain injury. Within the last decade, there has been tremendous growth in the literature regarding this disease entity. Purpose: To describe the obstacles necessary to overcome in performing a rigorous and sound clinical research study investigating mild traumatic brain injury. This examination begins by a consideration of changing standards for good faith open and total reporting of any and all conflicts of interest or commitment. This issue is particularly critical in mTBI research. We next examine obstacles that include but are not limited to diagnostic criteria, inclusion/exclusion criteria, source of injury, previous history of injury, presence of comorbid conditions and proper informed consent of participants. Frequently, multi-center studies are necessary for adequate subject accrual with the added challenges of site coordination, data core management and site specific study conduct. We propose a total reversal to the traditional translational research approach where clinical studies drive new concepts for future basic science studies. Conclusions: There have been few mild traumatic brain injury clinical trials in the literature with treatments/interventions that have been able to overcome many of these described obstacles. We look forward to the results of current and ongoing clinical mild traumatic brain injury studies providing the tools necessary for the next generation of basic science projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 19 2016

Fingerprint

Brain Concussion
Clinical Trials
Wounds and Injuries
Conflict of Interest
Translational Medical Research
Informed Consent
Research
Growth
Population

Keywords

  • Clinical trial
  • Mild traumatic brain injury
  • Neurosensory
  • Vestibular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Clinical trials in mild traumatic brain injury. / Hoffer, Michael E; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Balaban, Carey.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 19.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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