Clinical outcomes of intestinal transplant recipients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms: a retrospective study

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Abstract

Rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) colonization among intestinal transplant (ITx) recipients have not been reported. Colonization rates with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CR-GNB), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained retrospectively in adults undergoing ITx (isolated or multivisceral) from 1/2009 to 12/2015. We assessed for VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA bacteremia during the first year post-transplant for patients colonized with VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA, respectively, and for those who were not colonized. We evaluated whether the number of hospitalization days and one year post-transplant survival were different in MDRO-colonized patients. Forty-five ITx recipients were identified. Twenty-eight (62%) were colonized with MDRO [VRE in 22 (50%) patients, MRSA in seven (16%), and CR-GNB in six (15%)]. VRE and CR-GNB-colonized patients were more likely to develop VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia, respectively, than noncolonized patients [8/22 (36%) vs. 1/23 (4%), and 4/6 (67%) vs. 2/39 (5%), P < 0.05 for both]. There was no difference in one-year survival between MDRO-colonized and noncolonized patients. However, survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed VRE, CR-GNB, or MRSA bacteremia (P < 0.001). MDRO colonization was common among our ITx recipients. VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia was more common among colonized patients, and survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed bacteremia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)924-931
Number of pages8
JournalTransplant International
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Carbapenems
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Retrospective Studies
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Bacteremia
Survival
Transplants
Transplant Recipients
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • bacteremia
  • intestinal transplant
  • multidrug-resistant organisms colonization
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

@article{b873784d61af481c9c48949a207c5e8d,
title = "Clinical outcomes of intestinal transplant recipients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms: a retrospective study",
abstract = "Rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) colonization among intestinal transplant (ITx) recipients have not been reported. Colonization rates with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CR-GNB), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained retrospectively in adults undergoing ITx (isolated or multivisceral) from 1/2009 to 12/2015. We assessed for VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA bacteremia during the first year post-transplant for patients colonized with VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA, respectively, and for those who were not colonized. We evaluated whether the number of hospitalization days and one year post-transplant survival were different in MDRO-colonized patients. Forty-five ITx recipients were identified. Twenty-eight (62{\%}) were colonized with MDRO [VRE in 22 (50{\%}) patients, MRSA in seven (16{\%}), and CR-GNB in six (15{\%})]. VRE and CR-GNB-colonized patients were more likely to develop VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia, respectively, than noncolonized patients [8/22 (36{\%}) vs. 1/23 (4{\%}), and 4/6 (67{\%}) vs. 2/39 (5{\%}), P < 0.05 for both]. There was no difference in one-year survival between MDRO-colonized and noncolonized patients. However, survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed VRE, CR-GNB, or MRSA bacteremia (P < 0.001). MDRO colonization was common among our ITx recipients. VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia was more common among colonized patients, and survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed bacteremia.",
keywords = "bacteremia, intestinal transplant, multidrug-resistant organisms colonization, survival",
author = "Jacques Simkins and Morris, {Michele I.} and Camargo, {Jose F.} and Rodrigo Vianna and Thiago Beduschi and Abbo, {Lilian M.}",
year = "2017",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Clinical outcomes of intestinal transplant recipients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms

T2 - a retrospective study

AU - Simkins, Jacques

AU - Morris, Michele I.

AU - Camargo, Jose F.

AU - Vianna, Rodrigo

AU - Beduschi, Thiago

AU - Abbo, Lilian M.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) colonization among intestinal transplant (ITx) recipients have not been reported. Colonization rates with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CR-GNB), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained retrospectively in adults undergoing ITx (isolated or multivisceral) from 1/2009 to 12/2015. We assessed for VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA bacteremia during the first year post-transplant for patients colonized with VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA, respectively, and for those who were not colonized. We evaluated whether the number of hospitalization days and one year post-transplant survival were different in MDRO-colonized patients. Forty-five ITx recipients were identified. Twenty-eight (62%) were colonized with MDRO [VRE in 22 (50%) patients, MRSA in seven (16%), and CR-GNB in six (15%)]. VRE and CR-GNB-colonized patients were more likely to develop VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia, respectively, than noncolonized patients [8/22 (36%) vs. 1/23 (4%), and 4/6 (67%) vs. 2/39 (5%), P < 0.05 for both]. There was no difference in one-year survival between MDRO-colonized and noncolonized patients. However, survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed VRE, CR-GNB, or MRSA bacteremia (P < 0.001). MDRO colonization was common among our ITx recipients. VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia was more common among colonized patients, and survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed bacteremia.

AB - Rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) colonization among intestinal transplant (ITx) recipients have not been reported. Colonization rates with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CR-GNB), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained retrospectively in adults undergoing ITx (isolated or multivisceral) from 1/2009 to 12/2015. We assessed for VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA bacteremia during the first year post-transplant for patients colonized with VRE, CR-GNB, and MRSA, respectively, and for those who were not colonized. We evaluated whether the number of hospitalization days and one year post-transplant survival were different in MDRO-colonized patients. Forty-five ITx recipients were identified. Twenty-eight (62%) were colonized with MDRO [VRE in 22 (50%) patients, MRSA in seven (16%), and CR-GNB in six (15%)]. VRE and CR-GNB-colonized patients were more likely to develop VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia, respectively, than noncolonized patients [8/22 (36%) vs. 1/23 (4%), and 4/6 (67%) vs. 2/39 (5%), P < 0.05 for both]. There was no difference in one-year survival between MDRO-colonized and noncolonized patients. However, survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed VRE, CR-GNB, or MRSA bacteremia (P < 0.001). MDRO colonization was common among our ITx recipients. VRE and CR-GNB bacteremia was more common among colonized patients, and survival was lower among MDRO-colonized patients who developed bacteremia.

KW - bacteremia

KW - intestinal transplant

KW - multidrug-resistant organisms colonization

KW - survival

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