Clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients receiving long-term therapy with inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin

F. Cortazar, M. Z. Molnar, T. Isakova, M. E. Czira, C. P. Kovesdy, David Roth, I. Mucsi, M. Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus and everolimus, reduce the incidence of acute rejection following kidney transplantation, but their impact on clinical outcomes beyond 2 years after transplantation is unknown. We examined risks of mortality and allograft loss in a prospective observational study of 993 prevalent kidney transplant recipients who enrolled a median of 72 months after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 37 months, 87 patients died and 102 suffered allograft loss. In the overall population, use of mTOR inhibitors at enrollment was not associated with altered risk of allograft loss, and their association with increased mortality was of borderline significance. However, history of malignancy was the strongest predictor of both mortality and therapy with an mTOR inhibitor. Among patients without a history of malignancy, use of mTOR inhibitors was associated with significantly increased risk of mortality in propensity score-adjusted (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2, 5.5; p = 0.01), multivariable-adjusted (HR 3.2; 95% CI, 1.5, 6.5; p = 0.002) and one-to-one propensity score-matched analyses (HR 5.6; 95% CI 1.2, 25.7; p = 0.03). Additional studies are needed to examine the long-term safety of mTOR inhibitors in kidney transplantation, especially among recipients without a history of malignancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-387
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Fingerprint

Sirolimus
Kidney
Allografts
Propensity Score
Mortality
Kidney Transplantation
Therapeutics
Transplantation
Neoplasms
Observational Studies
Transplant Recipients
Prospective Studies
Safety
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • Allograft loss
  • kidney transplantation
  • mortality
  • mTOR inhibitors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients receiving long-term therapy with inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin. / Cortazar, F.; Molnar, M. Z.; Isakova, T.; Czira, M. E.; Kovesdy, C. P.; Roth, David; Mucsi, I.; Wolf, M.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.02.2012, p. 379-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cortazar, F. ; Molnar, M. Z. ; Isakova, T. ; Czira, M. E. ; Kovesdy, C. P. ; Roth, David ; Mucsi, I. ; Wolf, M. / Clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients receiving long-term therapy with inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 379-387.
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