Clinical decision making based on data from GDx: One-year observations

James C. Bobrow, Robert Ritch, Douglas Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether information derived from the GDx scanning laser polarimeter aids in the clinical decision-making process for patients with various types of glaucoma. Methods: Over a 4-month period, 342 consecutive patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, angle-closure glaucoma, or secondary glaucomas or in whom the diagnosis of glaucoma was uncertain were evaluated with the GDx scanning laser. After 1 year, 153 patients with glaucoma underwent GDx analysis again. Chart review revealed that 42 of the 153 patients had a change in therapy as a result of the GDx evaluation combined with analysis of visual fields, optic disc cupping, and intraocular pressure (IOP). Outcomes were then compared. Results: The group who had a change in therapy had a higher average GDx number (51.5 ± 26.1 vs 37.0 ± 23.5 [P=.001]) at the initial visit and higher IOP (18.2 ± 4.6 vs 16.0 ± 3.2 mm Hg [P=.005]). In spite of a change in therapy, at an average of 344 days later, IOP was unchanged (18.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.7 ± 3.2 mm Hg [P=.001]) and GDx values in the altered therapy group were higher than at baseline (57.3 ± 27.9 vs 36.7 ± 23.4 [P=.001]), although the differences within each group did not achieve statistical significance. Conclusion: GDx analysis may be helpful in determining patients at risk for damage from glaucoma, even in eyes in which cup-disc ratio and field loss have not progressed. Changing medications without significantly reducing IOP may be insufficient to halt increases in GDx numbers and may indicate a need for more aggressive therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-136
Number of pages6
JournalTransactions of the American Ophthalmological Society
Volume100
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Glaucoma
Intraocular Pressure
Lasers
Angle Closure Glaucoma
Ocular Hypertension
Optic Disk
Therapeutics
Group Psychotherapy
Visual Fields
Clinical Decision-Making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Clinical decision making based on data from GDx : One-year observations. / Bobrow, James C.; Ritch, Robert; Anderson, Douglas.

In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, Vol. 100, 01.12.2002, p. 131-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bobrow, James C. ; Ritch, Robert ; Anderson, Douglas. / Clinical decision making based on data from GDx : One-year observations. In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. 2002 ; Vol. 100. pp. 131-136.
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