Climate literacy as a foundation for progress in predicting and adapting to the climate of the coming decades

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Abstract

The workshop on predicting the climate of the coming decades, held on January 11-14, 2010, Miami, Florida, addressed different and complementary aspects of the decadal prediction problem. It was found that the challenge of decadal climate prediction is to quantify sources of climate predictability on interannual to decadal time scales and to provide probabilistic regional forecasts with sufficient skill for planning and decision-making purposes. The symposium highlighted that public lands and marine ecosystem managers are responding to climate change with various approaches, the US National Parks Service is one such example. Research on low probability-high impact events, such as hurricanes, has shown that, even when the public has information about weather information, information is misinterpreted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-635
Number of pages3
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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literacy
climate prediction
climate
marine ecosystem
hurricane
national park
decision making
timescale
weather
climate change
prediction
forecast
planning
public
services
public information
land

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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