Classification of audiograms by sequential testing: reliability and validity of an automated behavioral hearing screening algorithm.

R. E. Eilers, Ozcan Ozdamar, M. L. Steffens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1990, CAST (classification of audiograms by sequential testing) was proposed and developed as an automated, innovative approach to screening infant hearing using a modified Bayesian method. The method generated a four-frequency audiogram in a minimal number of test trials using VRA (visual reinforcement audiometry) techniques. Computer simulations were used to explore the properties (efficiency and accuracy) of the paradigm. The current work is designed to further test the utility of the paradigm with human infants and young children. Accordingly, infants and children between 6 months and 2 years of age were screened for hearing loss. The algorithm's efficacy was studied with respect to validity and reliability. Validity was evaluated by comparing CAST results with tympanometric data and outcomes of staircase-based testing. Test-retest reliability was also assessed. Results indicate that CAST is a valid, efficient, reliable, and potentially cost-effective screening method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-181
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 1993

Fingerprint

Reproducibility of Results
Hearing
Audiometry
Bayes Theorem
Hearing Loss
Computer Simulation
Efficiency
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Classification of audiograms by sequential testing : reliability and validity of an automated behavioral hearing screening algorithm. / Eilers, R. E.; Ozdamar, Ozcan; Steffens, M. L.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.05.1993, p. 172-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{116a089777d14d9f9890ca3487647012,
title = "Classification of audiograms by sequential testing: reliability and validity of an automated behavioral hearing screening algorithm.",
abstract = "In 1990, CAST (classification of audiograms by sequential testing) was proposed and developed as an automated, innovative approach to screening infant hearing using a modified Bayesian method. The method generated a four-frequency audiogram in a minimal number of test trials using VRA (visual reinforcement audiometry) techniques. Computer simulations were used to explore the properties (efficiency and accuracy) of the paradigm. The current work is designed to further test the utility of the paradigm with human infants and young children. Accordingly, infants and children between 6 months and 2 years of age were screened for hearing loss. The algorithm's efficacy was studied with respect to validity and reliability. Validity was evaluated by comparing CAST results with tympanometric data and outcomes of staircase-based testing. Test-retest reliability was also assessed. Results indicate that CAST is a valid, efficient, reliable, and potentially cost-effective screening method.",
author = "Eilers, {R. E.} and Ozcan Ozdamar and Steffens, {M. L.}",
year = "1993",
month = "5",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "172--181",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Audiology",
issn = "1050-0545",
publisher = "American Academy of Audiology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Classification of audiograms by sequential testing

T2 - reliability and validity of an automated behavioral hearing screening algorithm.

AU - Eilers, R. E.

AU - Ozdamar, Ozcan

AU - Steffens, M. L.

PY - 1993/5/1

Y1 - 1993/5/1

N2 - In 1990, CAST (classification of audiograms by sequential testing) was proposed and developed as an automated, innovative approach to screening infant hearing using a modified Bayesian method. The method generated a four-frequency audiogram in a minimal number of test trials using VRA (visual reinforcement audiometry) techniques. Computer simulations were used to explore the properties (efficiency and accuracy) of the paradigm. The current work is designed to further test the utility of the paradigm with human infants and young children. Accordingly, infants and children between 6 months and 2 years of age were screened for hearing loss. The algorithm's efficacy was studied with respect to validity and reliability. Validity was evaluated by comparing CAST results with tympanometric data and outcomes of staircase-based testing. Test-retest reliability was also assessed. Results indicate that CAST is a valid, efficient, reliable, and potentially cost-effective screening method.

AB - In 1990, CAST (classification of audiograms by sequential testing) was proposed and developed as an automated, innovative approach to screening infant hearing using a modified Bayesian method. The method generated a four-frequency audiogram in a minimal number of test trials using VRA (visual reinforcement audiometry) techniques. Computer simulations were used to explore the properties (efficiency and accuracy) of the paradigm. The current work is designed to further test the utility of the paradigm with human infants and young children. Accordingly, infants and children between 6 months and 2 years of age were screened for hearing loss. The algorithm's efficacy was studied with respect to validity and reliability. Validity was evaluated by comparing CAST results with tympanometric data and outcomes of staircase-based testing. Test-retest reliability was also assessed. Results indicate that CAST is a valid, efficient, reliable, and potentially cost-effective screening method.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027597603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027597603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8318708

AN - SCOPUS:0027597603

VL - 4

SP - 172

EP - 181

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Audiology

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Audiology

SN - 1050-0545

IS - 3

ER -