Cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among Hispanic/Latino adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

Frank C. Bandiera, William Arguelles, Marc Gellman, Sheila F. Castañeda, Janice Barnhart, Patricia Gonzalez, Elena L. Navas-Nacher, Hugo Salgado, Gregory A. Talavera, Neil Schneiderman, David J Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: In the present study, we investigated associations among cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms in Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods: The multisite prospective population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (aged 18-74) from diverse backgrounds (n = 16,412) in 4 U.S. communities (Chicago, San Diego, Miami, and Bronx). Households were selected using a stratified 2-stage probability sampling design and door-to-door recruitment, and sampling weights calibrated to the 2010 U.S. Population Census. Hispanic/Latino individuals of Dominican, Central American, South American, Cuban, Mexican, and Puerto Rican background were considered. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms were measured by self-report. Results: Results indicated that current smokers had greater odds for significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 10) than never smokers in all Hispanic background groups [odds ratio (OR) > 1.5]. Depressed persons were not more likely to receive prescribed smoking cessation medications from a doctor (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.98-2.08), take over-the-counter medications (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.75-1.66), or receive psychotherapy (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.57-1.85). Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings suggest that the positive association between smoking status and depressive symptoms is present in all examined Hispanic/Latino background groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-734
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Hispanic Americans
Smoking
Depression
Health
Smoking Cessation
Odds Ratio
Withholding Treatment
Censuses
Psychotherapy
Self Report
Population
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among Hispanic/Latino adults : Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). / Bandiera, Frank C.; Arguelles, William; Gellman, Marc; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Barnhart, Janice; Gonzalez, Patricia; Navas-Nacher, Elena L.; Salgado, Hugo; Talavera, Gregory A.; Schneiderman, Neil; Lee, David J.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 6, 2015, p. 727-734.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bandiera, Frank C. ; Arguelles, William ; Gellman, Marc ; Castañeda, Sheila F. ; Barnhart, Janice ; Gonzalez, Patricia ; Navas-Nacher, Elena L. ; Salgado, Hugo ; Talavera, Gregory A. ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Lee, David J. / Cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among Hispanic/Latino adults : Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 727-734.
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abstract = "Introduction: In the present study, we investigated associations among cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms in Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods: The multisite prospective population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (aged 18-74) from diverse backgrounds (n = 16,412) in 4 U.S. communities (Chicago, San Diego, Miami, and Bronx). Households were selected using a stratified 2-stage probability sampling design and door-to-door recruitment, and sampling weights calibrated to the 2010 U.S. Population Census. Hispanic/Latino individuals of Dominican, Central American, South American, Cuban, Mexican, and Puerto Rican background were considered. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms were measured by self-report. Results: Results indicated that current smokers had greater odds for significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 10) than never smokers in all Hispanic background groups [odds ratio (OR) > 1.5]. Depressed persons were not more likely to receive prescribed smoking cessation medications from a doctor (OR = 1.43, 95{\%} CI = 0.98-2.08), take over-the-counter medications (OR = 1.11, 95{\%} CI = 0.75-1.66), or receive psychotherapy (OR = 1.02, 95{\%} CI = 0.57-1.85). Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings suggest that the positive association between smoking status and depressive symptoms is present in all examined Hispanic/Latino background groups.",
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AU - Arguelles, William

AU - Gellman, Marc

AU - Castañeda, Sheila F.

AU - Barnhart, Janice

AU - Gonzalez, Patricia

AU - Navas-Nacher, Elena L.

AU - Salgado, Hugo

AU - Talavera, Gregory A.

AU - Schneiderman, Neil

AU - Lee, David J

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N2 - Introduction: In the present study, we investigated associations among cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms in Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods: The multisite prospective population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (aged 18-74) from diverse backgrounds (n = 16,412) in 4 U.S. communities (Chicago, San Diego, Miami, and Bronx). Households were selected using a stratified 2-stage probability sampling design and door-to-door recruitment, and sampling weights calibrated to the 2010 U.S. Population Census. Hispanic/Latino individuals of Dominican, Central American, South American, Cuban, Mexican, and Puerto Rican background were considered. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms were measured by self-report. Results: Results indicated that current smokers had greater odds for significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 10) than never smokers in all Hispanic background groups [odds ratio (OR) > 1.5]. Depressed persons were not more likely to receive prescribed smoking cessation medications from a doctor (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.98-2.08), take over-the-counter medications (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.75-1.66), or receive psychotherapy (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.57-1.85). Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings suggest that the positive association between smoking status and depressive symptoms is present in all examined Hispanic/Latino background groups.

AB - Introduction: In the present study, we investigated associations among cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms in Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods: The multisite prospective population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (aged 18-74) from diverse backgrounds (n = 16,412) in 4 U.S. communities (Chicago, San Diego, Miami, and Bronx). Households were selected using a stratified 2-stage probability sampling design and door-to-door recruitment, and sampling weights calibrated to the 2010 U.S. Population Census. Hispanic/Latino individuals of Dominican, Central American, South American, Cuban, Mexican, and Puerto Rican background were considered. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation treatment, and depressive symptoms were measured by self-report. Results: Results indicated that current smokers had greater odds for significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 10) than never smokers in all Hispanic background groups [odds ratio (OR) > 1.5]. Depressed persons were not more likely to receive prescribed smoking cessation medications from a doctor (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.98-2.08), take over-the-counter medications (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.75-1.66), or receive psychotherapy (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.57-1.85). Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings suggest that the positive association between smoking status and depressive symptoms is present in all examined Hispanic/Latino background groups.

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