Chronic toxicity of lead to three freshwater invertebrates - Brachionus calyciflorus, Chironomus tentans, and Lymnaea stagnalis

Martin Grosell, Robert M. Gerdes, Kevin V. Brix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic lead (Pb) toxicity tests with Brachionus calyciflorus, Chironomus tentans, and Lymnaea stagnalis were performed in artificial freshwaters. The no-observable-effect concentration (NOEC), lowest-observable-effect concentration (LOEC), and calculated 20% effect concentration (EC20) for the rotifer B. calyciflorus were 194, 284, and 125 μg dissolved Pb/L, respectively. The midge C. tentans was less sensitive, with NOEC and LOEC of 109 and 497 μg dissolved Pb/L, respectively, and the snail L. stagnalis exhibited extreme sensitivity, evident by NOEC, LOEC, and EC20 of 12, 16, and <4 μg dissolved Pb/L, respectively. Our findings are presented in the context of other reports on chronic Pb toxicity in freshwater organisms. The L. stagnalis results are in agreement with a previous report on pulmonate snails and should be viewed in the context of current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) hardness adjusted water quality criteria of 8 μg Pb/L. The present findings and earlier reports indicate that freshwater pulmonate snails may not be protected by current regulatory standards. Measurements of whole-snail Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations following chronic Pb exposure revealed that Na+ homeostasis is disturbed by Pb exposure in juvenile snails in a complicated pattern, suggesting two physiological modes of action depending on the Pb exposure concentration. Substantially reduced growth in the snails that exhibit very high Ca2+ requirements may be related to reduced Ca2+ uptake and thereby reduced shell formation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Chironomidae
Lymnaea
Snails
Invertebrates
Fresh Water
Toxicity
snail
invertebrate
toxicity
Environmental Protection Agency
Water quality
Toxicity Tests
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Water Quality
Hardness
homeostasis
effect
toxicity test
Homeostasis
hardness

Keywords

  • Brachionus calyciflorus
  • Chironomus tentans
  • Lead
  • Lymnaea stagnalis
  • Species sensitivity distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Chronic toxicity of lead to three freshwater invertebrates - Brachionus calyciflorus, Chironomus tentans, and Lymnaea stagnalis. / Grosell, Martin; Gerdes, Robert M.; Brix, Kevin V.

In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 97-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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