Childhood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression

Meena Vythilingam, Christine Heim, Donald J Newport, Andrew H. Miller, Eric Anderson, Richard Bronen, Marijn Brummer, Lawrence Staib, Eric Vermetten, Dennis S. Charney, Charles Nemeroff, J. Douglas Bremner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

567 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Smaller hippocampal volume has been reported only in some but not all studies of unipolar major depressive disorder. Severe stress early in life has also been associated with smaller hippocampal volume and with persistent changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, prior hippocampal morphometric studies in depressed patients have neither reported nor controlled for a history of early childhood trauma. In this study, the volumes of the hippocampus and of control brain regions were measured in depressed women with and without childhood abuse and in healthy nonabused comparison subjects. Method: Study participants were 32 women with current unipolar major depressive disorder - 21 with a history of prepubertal physical and/or sexual abuse and 11 without a history of prepubertal abuse - and 14 healthy nonabused female volunteers. The volumes of the whole hippocampus, temporal lobe, and whole brain were measured on coronal MRI scans by a single rater who was blind to the subjects' diagnoses. Results: The depressed subjects with childhood abuse had an 18% smaller mean left hippocampal volume than the nonabused depressed subjects and a 15% smaller mean left hippocampal volume than the healthy subjects. Right hippocampal volume was similar across the three groups. The right and left hippocampal volumes in the depressed women without abuse were similar to those in the healthy subjects. Conclusions: A smaller hippocampal volume in adult women with major depressive disorder was observed exclusively in those who had a history of severe and prolonged physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood. An unreported history of childhood abuse in depressed subjects could in part explain the inconsistencies in hippocampal volume findings in prior studies in major depressive disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2072-2080
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume159
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Major Depressive Disorder
Depression
Sex Offenses
Wounds and Injuries
Hippocampus
Healthy Volunteers
Brain
Temporal Lobe
Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Physical Abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Vythilingam, M., Heim, C., Newport, D. J., Miller, A. H., Anderson, E., Bronen, R., ... Douglas Bremner, J. (2002). Childhood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression. American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(12), 2072-2080. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.159.12.2072

Childhood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression. / Vythilingam, Meena; Heim, Christine; Newport, Donald J; Miller, Andrew H.; Anderson, Eric; Bronen, Richard; Brummer, Marijn; Staib, Lawrence; Vermetten, Eric; Charney, Dennis S.; Nemeroff, Charles; Douglas Bremner, J.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 159, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 2072-2080.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vythilingam, M, Heim, C, Newport, DJ, Miller, AH, Anderson, E, Bronen, R, Brummer, M, Staib, L, Vermetten, E, Charney, DS, Nemeroff, C & Douglas Bremner, J 2002, 'Childhood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 159, no. 12, pp. 2072-2080. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.159.12.2072
Vythilingam, Meena ; Heim, Christine ; Newport, Donald J ; Miller, Andrew H. ; Anderson, Eric ; Bronen, Richard ; Brummer, Marijn ; Staib, Lawrence ; Vermetten, Eric ; Charney, Dennis S. ; Nemeroff, Charles ; Douglas Bremner, J. / Childhood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2002 ; Vol. 159, No. 12. pp. 2072-2080.
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AU - Brummer, Marijn

AU - Staib, Lawrence

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