Characterization of the anatomy and conduction velocities of the human right atrial flutter circuit determined by noncontact mapping

Richard J. Schilling, Nicholas S. Peters, Jeffrey Goldberger, Alan H. Kadish, D. Wyn Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES. This study was done to characterize human right atrial (RA) flutter (AFL) using noncontact mapping. BACKGROUND. Atrial flutter has been mapped using sequential techniques, but complex anatomy makes simultaneous global RA mapping difficult. METHODS. Noncontact mapping was used to map the RA of 13 patients with AFL (5 with previous attempts), 11 with counterclockwise and 2 with clockwise AFL. "Reconstructed" electrograms were validated against contact electrograms using cross-correlation. The Cartesian coordinates of points on a virtual endocardium were used to calculate the length and thus the conduction velocity (CV) of the AFL wave front within the tricuspid annulus-inferior vena cave isthmus (IS) and either side of the crista terminalis (CT). RESULTS. When clearly seen, the AFL wave front split (n = 3) or turned in the region of the coronary sinus os (n = 6). Activation progressed toward the tricuspid annulus (TA) from the surrounding RA in 10 patients, suggesting that the leading edge of the reentry wave front is not always at the TA. The IS length and CV was 47.73 ± 24.40 mm (mean ± SD) and 0.74 ± 0.36 m/s. The CV was similar for the smooth and trabeculated RA (1.16 ± 0.48 m/s and 1.22 ± 0.65 m/s, respectively [p = 0.67]) and faster than the IS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05 for smooth and trabeculated, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Noncontact mapping of AFL has been validated and has demonstrated that IS CV is significantly slower than either side of the CT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-393
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atrial Flutter
Anatomy
Endocardium
Coronary Sinus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Characterization of the anatomy and conduction velocities of the human right atrial flutter circuit determined by noncontact mapping. / Schilling, Richard J.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Goldberger, Jeffrey; Kadish, Alan H.; Davies, D. Wyn.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 18.08.2001, p. 385-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e9f8ca79b6804981984dba8920626387,
title = "Characterization of the anatomy and conduction velocities of the human right atrial flutter circuit determined by noncontact mapping",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES. This study was done to characterize human right atrial (RA) flutter (AFL) using noncontact mapping. BACKGROUND. Atrial flutter has been mapped using sequential techniques, but complex anatomy makes simultaneous global RA mapping difficult. METHODS. Noncontact mapping was used to map the RA of 13 patients with AFL (5 with previous attempts), 11 with counterclockwise and 2 with clockwise AFL. {"}Reconstructed{"} electrograms were validated against contact electrograms using cross-correlation. The Cartesian coordinates of points on a virtual endocardium were used to calculate the length and thus the conduction velocity (CV) of the AFL wave front within the tricuspid annulus-inferior vena cave isthmus (IS) and either side of the crista terminalis (CT). RESULTS. When clearly seen, the AFL wave front split (n = 3) or turned in the region of the coronary sinus os (n = 6). Activation progressed toward the tricuspid annulus (TA) from the surrounding RA in 10 patients, suggesting that the leading edge of the reentry wave front is not always at the TA. The IS length and CV was 47.73 ± 24.40 mm (mean ± SD) and 0.74 ± 0.36 m/s. The CV was similar for the smooth and trabeculated RA (1.16 ± 0.48 m/s and 1.22 ± 0.65 m/s, respectively [p = 0.67]) and faster than the IS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05 for smooth and trabeculated, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Noncontact mapping of AFL has been validated and has demonstrated that IS CV is significantly slower than either side of the CT.",
author = "Schilling, {Richard J.} and Peters, {Nicholas S.} and Jeffrey Goldberger and Kadish, {Alan H.} and Davies, {D. Wyn}",
year = "2001",
month = "8",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1016/S0735-1097(01)01401-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "385--393",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Cardiology",
issn = "0735-1097",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization of the anatomy and conduction velocities of the human right atrial flutter circuit determined by noncontact mapping

AU - Schilling, Richard J.

AU - Peters, Nicholas S.

AU - Goldberger, Jeffrey

AU - Kadish, Alan H.

AU - Davies, D. Wyn

PY - 2001/8/18

Y1 - 2001/8/18

N2 - OBJECTIVES. This study was done to characterize human right atrial (RA) flutter (AFL) using noncontact mapping. BACKGROUND. Atrial flutter has been mapped using sequential techniques, but complex anatomy makes simultaneous global RA mapping difficult. METHODS. Noncontact mapping was used to map the RA of 13 patients with AFL (5 with previous attempts), 11 with counterclockwise and 2 with clockwise AFL. "Reconstructed" electrograms were validated against contact electrograms using cross-correlation. The Cartesian coordinates of points on a virtual endocardium were used to calculate the length and thus the conduction velocity (CV) of the AFL wave front within the tricuspid annulus-inferior vena cave isthmus (IS) and either side of the crista terminalis (CT). RESULTS. When clearly seen, the AFL wave front split (n = 3) or turned in the region of the coronary sinus os (n = 6). Activation progressed toward the tricuspid annulus (TA) from the surrounding RA in 10 patients, suggesting that the leading edge of the reentry wave front is not always at the TA. The IS length and CV was 47.73 ± 24.40 mm (mean ± SD) and 0.74 ± 0.36 m/s. The CV was similar for the smooth and trabeculated RA (1.16 ± 0.48 m/s and 1.22 ± 0.65 m/s, respectively [p = 0.67]) and faster than the IS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05 for smooth and trabeculated, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Noncontact mapping of AFL has been validated and has demonstrated that IS CV is significantly slower than either side of the CT.

AB - OBJECTIVES. This study was done to characterize human right atrial (RA) flutter (AFL) using noncontact mapping. BACKGROUND. Atrial flutter has been mapped using sequential techniques, but complex anatomy makes simultaneous global RA mapping difficult. METHODS. Noncontact mapping was used to map the RA of 13 patients with AFL (5 with previous attempts), 11 with counterclockwise and 2 with clockwise AFL. "Reconstructed" electrograms were validated against contact electrograms using cross-correlation. The Cartesian coordinates of points on a virtual endocardium were used to calculate the length and thus the conduction velocity (CV) of the AFL wave front within the tricuspid annulus-inferior vena cave isthmus (IS) and either side of the crista terminalis (CT). RESULTS. When clearly seen, the AFL wave front split (n = 3) or turned in the region of the coronary sinus os (n = 6). Activation progressed toward the tricuspid annulus (TA) from the surrounding RA in 10 patients, suggesting that the leading edge of the reentry wave front is not always at the TA. The IS length and CV was 47.73 ± 24.40 mm (mean ± SD) and 0.74 ± 0.36 m/s. The CV was similar for the smooth and trabeculated RA (1.16 ± 0.48 m/s and 1.22 ± 0.65 m/s, respectively [p = 0.67]) and faster than the IS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05 for smooth and trabeculated, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Noncontact mapping of AFL has been validated and has demonstrated that IS CV is significantly slower than either side of the CT.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034883329&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034883329&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0735-1097(01)01401-2

DO - 10.1016/S0735-1097(01)01401-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 11499728

AN - SCOPUS:0034883329

VL - 38

SP - 385

EP - 393

JO - Journal of the American College of Cardiology

JF - Journal of the American College of Cardiology

SN - 0735-1097

IS - 2

ER -