Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells

M. Picardo, Antonella Tosti, C. Marchese, C. Zompetta, M. R. Torrisi, A. Faggioni, N. Cameli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cultures of epidermal cells are commonly used to study skin biology and differentiation. Recently a method to culture nail matrix cells has been established. Objective: We report the biologic characteristics of nail matrix cells in vitro compared with those of epidermal keratinocytes. Methods: Human nail matrix cells were isolated and cultured in defined medium. Electron-microscopic examination, growth rate, integrin expression and keratin synthesis pattern were evaluated. In addition, the cells were cultured in serum-containing medium. Results: Nail matrix cells appear to be larger than human epidermal keratinocytes and, at the ultrastructural level, they contain a higher euchromatin/heterochromatin ratio and a lower nucleus/cytoplasm ratio and have a higher growth rate. The synthesis of 'hard' keratins was detected at all calcium concentrations. Immunofluorescence analyses showed the expression of α2, α3, and α6 integrin subunits. When cultured in serum-containing medium, nail matrix cells produced an outgrowth of epithelium and a spontaneous migration phenomenon associated with a tendency to stratify in a semilunar area that resembles the architecture of the nail matrix. The pluristratified epithelium showed characteristic markers of nail differentiation. Conclusion: Culture of nail matrix cells may represent a useful model to study the biologic properties of nail structure, alterations in some nail diseases and the effects of drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-440
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Nails
Keratins
Keratinocytes
Integrins
Nail Diseases
Epithelium
Euchromatin
Heterochromatin
Differentiation Antigens
Growth
Serum
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Cultured Cells
Cytoplasm
Cell Culture Techniques
Electrons
Calcium
Skin
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Picardo, M., Tosti, A., Marchese, C., Zompetta, C., Torrisi, M. R., Faggioni, A., & Cameli, N. (1994). Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 30(3), 434-440.

Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells. / Picardo, M.; Tosti, Antonella; Marchese, C.; Zompetta, C.; Torrisi, M. R.; Faggioni, A.; Cameli, N.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 434-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Picardo, M, Tosti, A, Marchese, C, Zompetta, C, Torrisi, MR, Faggioni, A & Cameli, N 1994, 'Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells', Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 434-440.
Picardo M, Tosti A, Marchese C, Zompetta C, Torrisi MR, Faggioni A et al. Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1994 Jan 1;30(3):434-440.
Picardo, M. ; Tosti, Antonella ; Marchese, C. ; Zompetta, C. ; Torrisi, M. R. ; Faggioni, A. ; Cameli, N. / Characterization of cultured nail matrix cells. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1994 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 434-440.
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