Chapter 6 Structure, Function, and Localization of Gβ5-RGS Complexes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Members of the R7 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, 7, 9, and 11) exist as heterodimers with the G protein beta subunit Gβ5. These protein complexes are only found in neurons and are defined by the presence of three domains: DEP/DHEX, Gβ5/GGL, and RGS. This article summarizes published work in the following areas: (1) the functional significance of structural organization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, (2) regional distribution of Gβ5-R7 in the nervous system and regulation of R7 family expression, (3) subcellular localization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, and (4) novel binding partners of Gβ5-R7 proteins. The review points out some contradictions between observations made by different research groups and highlights the importance of using alternative experimental approaches to obtain conclusive information about Gβ5-R7 function in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-203
Number of pages47
JournalProgress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science
Volume86
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

GTP-Binding Protein Regulators
GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits
RGS Proteins
Nervous System
Proteins
Neurons
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Chapter 6 Structure, Function, and Localization of Gβ5-RGS Complexes. / Slepak, Vladlen Z.

In: Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science, Vol. 86, No. C, 01.12.2009, p. 157-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{834e74902b814e8fa2a6c96a01774111,
title = "Chapter 6 Structure, Function, and Localization of Gβ5-RGS Complexes",
abstract = "Members of the R7 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, 7, 9, and 11) exist as heterodimers with the G protein beta subunit Gβ5. These protein complexes are only found in neurons and are defined by the presence of three domains: DEP/DHEX, Gβ5/GGL, and RGS. This article summarizes published work in the following areas: (1) the functional significance of structural organization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, (2) regional distribution of Gβ5-R7 in the nervous system and regulation of R7 family expression, (3) subcellular localization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, and (4) novel binding partners of Gβ5-R7 proteins. The review points out some contradictions between observations made by different research groups and highlights the importance of using alternative experimental approaches to obtain conclusive information about Gβ5-R7 function in vivo.",
author = "Slepak, {Vladlen Z}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1877-1173(09)86006-7",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "157--203",
journal = "Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science",
issn = "1877-1173",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "C",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chapter 6 Structure, Function, and Localization of Gβ5-RGS Complexes

AU - Slepak, Vladlen Z

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Members of the R7 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, 7, 9, and 11) exist as heterodimers with the G protein beta subunit Gβ5. These protein complexes are only found in neurons and are defined by the presence of three domains: DEP/DHEX, Gβ5/GGL, and RGS. This article summarizes published work in the following areas: (1) the functional significance of structural organization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, (2) regional distribution of Gβ5-R7 in the nervous system and regulation of R7 family expression, (3) subcellular localization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, and (4) novel binding partners of Gβ5-R7 proteins. The review points out some contradictions between observations made by different research groups and highlights the importance of using alternative experimental approaches to obtain conclusive information about Gβ5-R7 function in vivo.

AB - Members of the R7 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, 7, 9, and 11) exist as heterodimers with the G protein beta subunit Gβ5. These protein complexes are only found in neurons and are defined by the presence of three domains: DEP/DHEX, Gβ5/GGL, and RGS. This article summarizes published work in the following areas: (1) the functional significance of structural organization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, (2) regional distribution of Gβ5-R7 in the nervous system and regulation of R7 family expression, (3) subcellular localization of Gβ5-R7 complexes, and (4) novel binding partners of Gβ5-R7 proteins. The review points out some contradictions between observations made by different research groups and highlights the importance of using alternative experimental approaches to obtain conclusive information about Gβ5-R7 function in vivo.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953672708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953672708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1877-1173(09)86006-7

DO - 10.1016/S1877-1173(09)86006-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 20374716

AN - SCOPUS:77953672708

VL - 86

SP - 157

EP - 203

JO - Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science

JF - Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science

SN - 1877-1173

IS - C

ER -