Changes in family relationships affect the development of chemotherapy-related nausea symptoms

Youngmee Kim, Gary R. Morrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effect of changes in family relationships (cohesion, expression, and conflict) on patients' physical adjustment to chemotherapy and whether the effect would differ depending on the patient's age and gender. Two hundred thirty-three married cancer patients completed questionnaires consisting of measures of family relationships and chemotherapy- related nausea symptoms, at two assessments. Results revealed that the prevalence of nausea symptoms was related to the degree of conflict in the family, depending on the patient's age and gender, An increase in family conflict was associated with an increased duration of post-treatment nausea and greater severity of anticipatory nausea for younger adult patients but not for older adult patients. An increase in family conflict was also associated with a greater severity of anticipatory nausea for female patients but not for male patients. These findings suggest that intervention programs to help reduce family conflict may be especially beneficial for younger adult and female patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-177
Number of pages7
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Relations
Nausea
Drug Therapy
Family Conflict
Young Adult
Social Adjustment

Keywords

  • Age
  • Chemotherapy-related nausea
  • Family conflict
  • Family relationships
  • Gender differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Changes in family relationships affect the development of chemotherapy-related nausea symptoms. / Kim, Youngmee; Morrow, Gary R.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 171-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8c3f3f4e35da4e65a68b641e739ae1a8,
title = "Changes in family relationships affect the development of chemotherapy-related nausea symptoms",
abstract = "This study examined the effect of changes in family relationships (cohesion, expression, and conflict) on patients' physical adjustment to chemotherapy and whether the effect would differ depending on the patient's age and gender. Two hundred thirty-three married cancer patients completed questionnaires consisting of measures of family relationships and chemotherapy- related nausea symptoms, at two assessments. Results revealed that the prevalence of nausea symptoms was related to the degree of conflict in the family, depending on the patient's age and gender, An increase in family conflict was associated with an increased duration of post-treatment nausea and greater severity of anticipatory nausea for younger adult patients but not for older adult patients. An increase in family conflict was also associated with a greater severity of anticipatory nausea for female patients but not for male patients. These findings suggest that intervention programs to help reduce family conflict may be especially beneficial for younger adult and female patients.",
keywords = "Age, Chemotherapy-related nausea, Family conflict, Family relationships, Gender differences",
author = "Youngmee Kim and Morrow, {Gary R.}",
year = "2003",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "171--177",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in family relationships affect the development of chemotherapy-related nausea symptoms

AU - Kim, Youngmee

AU - Morrow, Gary R.

PY - 2003/3/1

Y1 - 2003/3/1

N2 - This study examined the effect of changes in family relationships (cohesion, expression, and conflict) on patients' physical adjustment to chemotherapy and whether the effect would differ depending on the patient's age and gender. Two hundred thirty-three married cancer patients completed questionnaires consisting of measures of family relationships and chemotherapy- related nausea symptoms, at two assessments. Results revealed that the prevalence of nausea symptoms was related to the degree of conflict in the family, depending on the patient's age and gender, An increase in family conflict was associated with an increased duration of post-treatment nausea and greater severity of anticipatory nausea for younger adult patients but not for older adult patients. An increase in family conflict was also associated with a greater severity of anticipatory nausea for female patients but not for male patients. These findings suggest that intervention programs to help reduce family conflict may be especially beneficial for younger adult and female patients.

AB - This study examined the effect of changes in family relationships (cohesion, expression, and conflict) on patients' physical adjustment to chemotherapy and whether the effect would differ depending on the patient's age and gender. Two hundred thirty-three married cancer patients completed questionnaires consisting of measures of family relationships and chemotherapy- related nausea symptoms, at two assessments. Results revealed that the prevalence of nausea symptoms was related to the degree of conflict in the family, depending on the patient's age and gender, An increase in family conflict was associated with an increased duration of post-treatment nausea and greater severity of anticipatory nausea for younger adult patients but not for older adult patients. An increase in family conflict was also associated with a greater severity of anticipatory nausea for female patients but not for male patients. These findings suggest that intervention programs to help reduce family conflict may be especially beneficial for younger adult and female patients.

KW - Age

KW - Chemotherapy-related nausea

KW - Family conflict

KW - Family relationships

KW - Gender differences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037868963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037868963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12618927

AN - SCOPUS:0037868963

VL - 11

SP - 171

EP - 177

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 3

ER -