Changes in cigarette smoking behavior among us young workers from 2005 to 2010: The role of occupation

Taghrid Asfar, Kristopher Arheart, Noella Dietz, Alberto J. Caban-Martinez, Lora E Fleming, David J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Young adult workers (18-24 years) in the United States have been identified as a high-risk group for smoking. This study compares changes in smoking behavior by occupational class among this group between 2005 and 2010. Methods: Data were pooled from the Tobacco Supplement in the 2005 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey. All respondents 18-24 years who reported that they were employed during the two surveys were selected (n = 1880 in 2005; and n = 1531 in 2010). Weighted percentages and 95% confidence interval were reported. Logistic regression analyses were performed to compare smoking behavior between occupational groups (white-collar, blue-collar, and service) and between years (2005-2010), and to examine correlates of smoking, successful quit attempt, and heavy smoking. Results: Smoking prevalence and daily smoking declined in 2010 in white-collar. Smoking prevalence and intensity decreased while age of smoking initiation increased in blue-collar workers. Young workers were more likely to smoke in 2005 than 2010. Service and blue-collar workers were more likely to smoke than white-collar workers. Older young adults, whites, individuals with a high school/or less education, those without health insurance were more likely to smoke. White workers and individuals with a high school/or less education were more likely to be heavy smokers. Conclusions: White-collar workers have benefited the most from tobacco control efforts. Although improvements were seen in smoking behavior among blue-collar workers, smoking prevalence remained the highest in this group. Smoking behavior among service workers did not change. Young service workers and blue-collar are priority populations for workplace tobacco control efforts. Implications: The current study examines changes in smoking behavior among young adult workers (18-24 years) by occupational class (white-collar, blue-collar, and service workers) between 2005 and 2010. Data were pooled from the Tobacco Supplement in the 2005 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Smoking prevalence and daily smoking declined significantly in whitecollar workers. No change in smoking behavior was observed among service workers. Positive changes in smoking behavior were observed among blue-collar workers, but smoking prevalence remained the highest in this group. Blue-collar and service workers are priority groups for future workplace tobacco control efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1414-1423
Number of pages10
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 16 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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