Cervical spinal cord injury after blunt assault: Just a pain in the neck?

Trine G. Eskesen, Josefine S. Baekgaard, Thomas Peponis, Jae Moo Lee, Noelle Saillant, Haytham M.A. Kaafarani, Peter J. Fagenholz, David R. King, Marc de Moya, George C. Velmahos, D. Dante Yeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) after blunt assault. Methods: The ACS National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) 2012 Research Data Set was used to identify victims of blunt assault using the ICD-9 E-codes 960.0, 968.2, 973. ICD-9 codes 805.00, 839.00, 806.00, 952.00 identified cervical vertebral fractures/dislocations and CSCI. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of CSCI. Results: 14,835 (2%) out of 833,311 NTDB cases were blunt assault victims and thus included. 217 (1%) had cervical vertebral fracture/dislocation without CSCI; 57 (0.4%) had CSCI. Age ≥55 years was independently predictive of CSCI; assault by striking/thrown object, facial fracture, and intracranial injury predicted the absence of CSCI. 25 (0.02%) patients with CSCI underwent cervical spinal fusion. Conclusions: CSCI is rare after blunt assault. While the odds of CSCI increase with age, facial fracture or intracranial injury predicts the absence of CSCI. The incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) after blunt assault was investigated. 14,835 blunt assault victims were identified; 217 had cervical vertebral fracture/dislocation without CSCI; 57 had CSCI. Age ≥55 years was found to independently predict CSCI, while assault by striking/thrown object, facial fracture, and intracranial injury predicted the absence of CSCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)648-652
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume217
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blunt assault
  • Cervical spinal cord injury
  • Cervical spine injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cervical spinal cord injury after blunt assault: Just a pain in the neck?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this