Cervical cancer risk and access: Utilizing three statistical tools to assess haitian women in south florida

Rhoda K. Moise, Raymond Balise, Camille Ragin, Erin Kobetz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

women who reported US citizenship (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.52 6.84), access to routine care (OR = 2.11, 95%CI = 1.04 4.30), and spent more years in the US (OR = 1.01, 95%CI = 1.00 1.03) were significantly more likely to report previous screening. CART results returned an accuracy of 0.75 with a tree initially splitting on women who were not citizens, then on 43 or fewer years in the U.S., and without access to routine care. RF model identified U.S. years, citizenship, and access to routine care as variables of highest importance indicated by greatest mean decreases in Gini index. The model was .79 accurate (95% CI = 0.74 0.84). This multi-pronged analysis identifies previously undocumented barriers to health screening for Haitian women. Recent US immigrants without citizenship or perceived access to routine care may be at higher risk for disease due to barriers in accessing U.S. health-systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0254089
JournalPloS one
Volume16
Issue number7 July
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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