Catastrophizing Mediates Associations Between Pain Severity, Psychological Distress, and Functional Disability Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

Phil Ullrich, Mark Jensen, John Loeser, Diana Cardenas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine associations between pain severity, psychological distress, catastrophizing, and indices of functional disability in a sample of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Catastrophizing was examined as a potential mediator of associations between pain severity, psychological distress, and functional disability. Design and Participants: Questionnaires assessing pain severity, psychological distress, catastrophizing, pain interference, and community integration were completed by 237 persons with SCI. Results: Psychological distress and pain severity were associated significantly with greater functional disability. Moreover, the association between pain severity and functional disability was strongest among persons with high psychological distress. Catastrophizing appeared to mediate the associations between pain severity, psychological distress, and functional disability. Conclusions: Pain severity and psychological distress have the potential for both direct and interactive effects on functional disability, possibly through the mediating effects of catastrophizing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-398
Number of pages9
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Keywords

  • catastrophizing
  • distress
  • functioning
  • pain
  • spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

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