Case series of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection ⇔ United Kingdom and United States, March–August 2020

Sapna Bamrah Morris, Noah G. Schwartz, Pragna Patel, Lilian Abbo, Laura Beauchamps, Shuba Balan, Ellen H. Lee, Rachel Paneth-Pollak, Anita Geevarughese, Maura K. Lash, Marie S. Dorsinville, Vennus Ballen, Daniel P. Eiras, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Emer Smith, Sara Robinson, Patricia Stogsdill, Sarah Lim, Sharon E. Fox, Gillian RichardsonJulie Hand, Nora T. Oliver, Aaron Kofman, Bobbi Bryant, Zachary Ende, Deblina Datta, Ermias Belay, Shana Godfred-Cato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

What is already known about this topic? Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare but severe complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and adolescents. Since June 2020, several case reports and series have been published reporting a similar multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). What is added by this report? Cases reported to CDC and published case reports and series identify MIS-A in adults, who usually require intensive care and can have fatal outcomes. Antibody testing was required to identify SARS-CoV-2 infection in approximately one third of 27 cases. What are the implications for public health practice? Clinical suspicion and indicated SARS-CoV-2 testing, including antibody testing, might be needed to recognize and treat adults with MIS-A. Further research is needed to understand the pathogenesis and long-term effects of this condition. Ultimately, the recognition of MIS-A reinforces the need for prevention efforts to limit spread of SARS-CoV-2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1450-1456
Number of pages7
JournalMorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Volume69
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 9 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Health Information Management

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