Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness

Arnold Peckerman, John J. LaManca, Sharon L. Smith, Andre Taylor, Lana Tiersky, Claudia Pollet, Leo R. Korn, Barry Hurwitz, John E. Ottenweller, Benjamin H. Natelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether inappropriate cardiovascular responses to stressors may underlie symptoms in Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue. Methods: Psychophysiological stress testing was performed on 51 Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue (using the 1994 case definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and 42 healthy veterans. Hemodynamic responses to cold pressor, speech, and arithmetic stressors were evaluated using impedance cardiography. Results: Veterans with chronic fatigue had diminished blood pressure responses during cognitive (speech and arithmetic) stress tests due to unusually small increases in total peripheral resistance. The cold pressor test, however, evoked similar blood pressure responses in the chronic fatigue and control groups. Low reactivity to cognitive stressors was associated with greater fatigue ratings among ill veterans, whereas an opposite relation was observed among healthy veterans. Self-reported neurocognitive decline was associated with low reactivity to the arithmetic task. Conclusions: These results suggest a physiological basis for some Gulf War veterans' reports of severe chronic fatigue. A greater deficit with responses processed through cerebral centers, as compared with a sensory stimulus (cold pressor), suggests a defect in cortical control of cardiovascular function. More research is needed to determine the specific mechanisms through which the dissociation between behavioral and cardiovascular activities identified in this study may be contributing to symptoms in Gulf War veterans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-516
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume62
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 16 2000

Fingerprint

Gulf War
Veterans
Fatigue
Impedance Cardiography
Blood Pressure
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Exercise Test
Vascular Resistance
Hemodynamics
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular stress response
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Gulf War illnesses
  • Impedance cardiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Peckerman, A., LaManca, J. J., Smith, S. L., Taylor, A., Tiersky, L., Pollet, C., ... Natelson, B. H. (2000). Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness. Psychosomatic Medicine, 62(4), 509-516.

Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness. / Peckerman, Arnold; LaManca, John J.; Smith, Sharon L.; Taylor, Andre; Tiersky, Lana; Pollet, Claudia; Korn, Leo R.; Hurwitz, Barry; Ottenweller, John E.; Natelson, Benjamin H.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 62, No. 4, 16.08.2000, p. 509-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peckerman, A, LaManca, JJ, Smith, SL, Taylor, A, Tiersky, L, Pollet, C, Korn, LR, Hurwitz, B, Ottenweller, JE & Natelson, BH 2000, 'Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness', Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 509-516.
Peckerman A, LaManca JJ, Smith SL, Taylor A, Tiersky L, Pollet C et al. Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2000 Aug 16;62(4):509-516.
Peckerman, Arnold ; LaManca, John J. ; Smith, Sharon L. ; Taylor, Andre ; Tiersky, Lana ; Pollet, Claudia ; Korn, Leo R. ; Hurwitz, Barry ; Ottenweller, John E. ; Natelson, Benjamin H. / Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 509-516.
@article{2d7fac1eb3ce4112b78c5a5a0572b66a,
title = "Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether inappropriate cardiovascular responses to stressors may underlie symptoms in Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue. Methods: Psychophysiological stress testing was performed on 51 Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue (using the 1994 case definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and 42 healthy veterans. Hemodynamic responses to cold pressor, speech, and arithmetic stressors were evaluated using impedance cardiography. Results: Veterans with chronic fatigue had diminished blood pressure responses during cognitive (speech and arithmetic) stress tests due to unusually small increases in total peripheral resistance. The cold pressor test, however, evoked similar blood pressure responses in the chronic fatigue and control groups. Low reactivity to cognitive stressors was associated with greater fatigue ratings among ill veterans, whereas an opposite relation was observed among healthy veterans. Self-reported neurocognitive decline was associated with low reactivity to the arithmetic task. Conclusions: These results suggest a physiological basis for some Gulf War veterans' reports of severe chronic fatigue. A greater deficit with responses processed through cerebral centers, as compared with a sensory stimulus (cold pressor), suggests a defect in cortical control of cardiovascular function. More research is needed to determine the specific mechanisms through which the dissociation between behavioral and cardiovascular activities identified in this study may be contributing to symptoms in Gulf War veterans.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular stress response, Chronic fatigue, Gulf War illnesses, Impedance cardiography",
author = "Arnold Peckerman and LaManca, {John J.} and Smith, {Sharon L.} and Andre Taylor and Lana Tiersky and Claudia Pollet and Korn, {Leo R.} and Barry Hurwitz and Ottenweller, {John E.} and Natelson, {Benjamin H.}",
year = "2000",
month = "8",
day = "16",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "509--516",
journal = "Psychosomatic Medicine",
issn = "0033-3174",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiovascular stress responses and their relation to symptoms in gulf war veterans with fatiguing illness

AU - Peckerman, Arnold

AU - LaManca, John J.

AU - Smith, Sharon L.

AU - Taylor, Andre

AU - Tiersky, Lana

AU - Pollet, Claudia

AU - Korn, Leo R.

AU - Hurwitz, Barry

AU - Ottenweller, John E.

AU - Natelson, Benjamin H.

PY - 2000/8/16

Y1 - 2000/8/16

N2 - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether inappropriate cardiovascular responses to stressors may underlie symptoms in Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue. Methods: Psychophysiological stress testing was performed on 51 Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue (using the 1994 case definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and 42 healthy veterans. Hemodynamic responses to cold pressor, speech, and arithmetic stressors were evaluated using impedance cardiography. Results: Veterans with chronic fatigue had diminished blood pressure responses during cognitive (speech and arithmetic) stress tests due to unusually small increases in total peripheral resistance. The cold pressor test, however, evoked similar blood pressure responses in the chronic fatigue and control groups. Low reactivity to cognitive stressors was associated with greater fatigue ratings among ill veterans, whereas an opposite relation was observed among healthy veterans. Self-reported neurocognitive decline was associated with low reactivity to the arithmetic task. Conclusions: These results suggest a physiological basis for some Gulf War veterans' reports of severe chronic fatigue. A greater deficit with responses processed through cerebral centers, as compared with a sensory stimulus (cold pressor), suggests a defect in cortical control of cardiovascular function. More research is needed to determine the specific mechanisms through which the dissociation between behavioral and cardiovascular activities identified in this study may be contributing to symptoms in Gulf War veterans.

AB - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether inappropriate cardiovascular responses to stressors may underlie symptoms in Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue. Methods: Psychophysiological stress testing was performed on 51 Gulf War veterans with chronic fatigue (using the 1994 case definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and 42 healthy veterans. Hemodynamic responses to cold pressor, speech, and arithmetic stressors were evaluated using impedance cardiography. Results: Veterans with chronic fatigue had diminished blood pressure responses during cognitive (speech and arithmetic) stress tests due to unusually small increases in total peripheral resistance. The cold pressor test, however, evoked similar blood pressure responses in the chronic fatigue and control groups. Low reactivity to cognitive stressors was associated with greater fatigue ratings among ill veterans, whereas an opposite relation was observed among healthy veterans. Self-reported neurocognitive decline was associated with low reactivity to the arithmetic task. Conclusions: These results suggest a physiological basis for some Gulf War veterans' reports of severe chronic fatigue. A greater deficit with responses processed through cerebral centers, as compared with a sensory stimulus (cold pressor), suggests a defect in cortical control of cardiovascular function. More research is needed to determine the specific mechanisms through which the dissociation between behavioral and cardiovascular activities identified in this study may be contributing to symptoms in Gulf War veterans.

KW - Cardiovascular stress response

KW - Chronic fatigue

KW - Gulf War illnesses

KW - Impedance cardiography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033853188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033853188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10949096

AN - SCOPUS:0033853188

VL - 62

SP - 509

EP - 516

JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

IS - 4

ER -