Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV): A cohort study

Steven E Lipshultz, Kirk A. Easley, E. John Orav, Samuel Kaplan, Thomas J. Starc, J. Timothy Bricker, Wyman W. Lai, Douglas S. Moodie, George Sopko, Mark D. Schluchter, Steven D. Colan

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Abstract

Background: Data from cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal studies have suggested that children infected with HIV-1 might have cardiovascular abnormalities. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis in a long-term cohort study. Methods: We measured cardiovascular function every 4-6 months for up to 5 years in a birth cohort of 600 infants born to women infected with HIV-1. We included 93 infants infected with HIV-1 and 463 uninfected infants (internal controls) from the same cohort. We also included a cross-sectionally measured comparison group of 195 healthy children born to mothers who were not infected with HIV-1 (external controls). Findings: Children infected with HIV-1 had a significantly higher heart rate at all ages (mean difference 10 bpm, 95% CI 8-13) than internal controls. At birth, both cohort groups of children had similar low left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening. At 8 months, fractional shortening was similar in internal and external controls, whereas in children infected with HIV-1, fractional shortening remained significantly lower than in controls for the first 20 months of life (mean difference from internal controls at 8 months 3.7%, 2.3-5.1). LV mass was similar at birth in both cohort groups, but became significantly higher in children with HIV-1 from 4-30 months (mean difference 2.4 g at 8 months, 0.9-3.9). Conclusions: Vertically-transmitted HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent cardiovascular abnormalities identifiable shortly after birth. Irrespective of their HIV-1 status, infants born to women infected with HIV-1 have significantly worse cardiac function than other infants, suggesting that the uterine environment has an important role in postnatal cardiovascular abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)368-373
Number of pages6
JournalLancet
Volume360
Issue number9330
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2002
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-1
Cohort Studies
HIV
Cardiovascular Abnormalities
Parturition
Internal-External Control
HIV Infections
Longitudinal Studies
Heart Rate
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipshultz, S. E., Easley, K. A., Orav, E. J., Kaplan, S., Starc, T. J., Bricker, J. T., ... Colan, S. D. (2002). Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV): A cohort study. Lancet, 360(9330), 368-373. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)09607-1

Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV) : A cohort study. / Lipshultz, Steven E; Easley, Kirk A.; Orav, E. John; Kaplan, Samuel; Starc, Thomas J.; Bricker, J. Timothy; Lai, Wyman W.; Moodie, Douglas S.; Sopko, George; Schluchter, Mark D.; Colan, Steven D.

In: Lancet, Vol. 360, No. 9330, 03.08.2002, p. 368-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lipshultz, SE, Easley, KA, Orav, EJ, Kaplan, S, Starc, TJ, Bricker, JT, Lai, WW, Moodie, DS, Sopko, G, Schluchter, MD & Colan, SD 2002, 'Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV): A cohort study', Lancet, vol. 360, no. 9330, pp. 368-373. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)09607-1
Lipshultz SE, Easley KA, Orav EJ, Kaplan S, Starc TJ, Bricker JT et al. Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV): A cohort study. Lancet. 2002 Aug 3;360(9330):368-373. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)09607-1
Lipshultz, Steven E ; Easley, Kirk A. ; Orav, E. John ; Kaplan, Samuel ; Starc, Thomas J. ; Bricker, J. Timothy ; Lai, Wyman W. ; Moodie, Douglas S. ; Sopko, George ; Schluchter, Mark D. ; Colan, Steven D. / Cardiovascular status of infants and children of women infected with HIV-1 (P2C2 HIV) : A cohort study. In: Lancet. 2002 ; Vol. 360, No. 9330. pp. 368-373.
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abstract = "Background: Data from cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal studies have suggested that children infected with HIV-1 might have cardiovascular abnormalities. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis in a long-term cohort study. Methods: We measured cardiovascular function every 4-6 months for up to 5 years in a birth cohort of 600 infants born to women infected with HIV-1. We included 93 infants infected with HIV-1 and 463 uninfected infants (internal controls) from the same cohort. We also included a cross-sectionally measured comparison group of 195 healthy children born to mothers who were not infected with HIV-1 (external controls). Findings: Children infected with HIV-1 had a significantly higher heart rate at all ages (mean difference 10 bpm, 95{\%} CI 8-13) than internal controls. At birth, both cohort groups of children had similar low left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening. At 8 months, fractional shortening was similar in internal and external controls, whereas in children infected with HIV-1, fractional shortening remained significantly lower than in controls for the first 20 months of life (mean difference from internal controls at 8 months 3.7{\%}, 2.3-5.1). LV mass was similar at birth in both cohort groups, but became significantly higher in children with HIV-1 from 4-30 months (mean difference 2.4 g at 8 months, 0.9-3.9). Conclusions: Vertically-transmitted HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent cardiovascular abnormalities identifiable shortly after birth. Irrespective of their HIV-1 status, infants born to women infected with HIV-1 have significantly worse cardiac function than other infants, suggesting that the uterine environment has an important role in postnatal cardiovascular abnormalities.",
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AU - Lipshultz, Steven E

AU - Easley, Kirk A.

AU - Orav, E. John

AU - Kaplan, Samuel

AU - Starc, Thomas J.

AU - Bricker, J. Timothy

AU - Lai, Wyman W.

AU - Moodie, Douglas S.

AU - Sopko, George

AU - Schluchter, Mark D.

AU - Colan, Steven D.

PY - 2002/8/3

Y1 - 2002/8/3

N2 - Background: Data from cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal studies have suggested that children infected with HIV-1 might have cardiovascular abnormalities. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis in a long-term cohort study. Methods: We measured cardiovascular function every 4-6 months for up to 5 years in a birth cohort of 600 infants born to women infected with HIV-1. We included 93 infants infected with HIV-1 and 463 uninfected infants (internal controls) from the same cohort. We also included a cross-sectionally measured comparison group of 195 healthy children born to mothers who were not infected with HIV-1 (external controls). Findings: Children infected with HIV-1 had a significantly higher heart rate at all ages (mean difference 10 bpm, 95% CI 8-13) than internal controls. At birth, both cohort groups of children had similar low left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening. At 8 months, fractional shortening was similar in internal and external controls, whereas in children infected with HIV-1, fractional shortening remained significantly lower than in controls for the first 20 months of life (mean difference from internal controls at 8 months 3.7%, 2.3-5.1). LV mass was similar at birth in both cohort groups, but became significantly higher in children with HIV-1 from 4-30 months (mean difference 2.4 g at 8 months, 0.9-3.9). Conclusions: Vertically-transmitted HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent cardiovascular abnormalities identifiable shortly after birth. Irrespective of their HIV-1 status, infants born to women infected with HIV-1 have significantly worse cardiac function than other infants, suggesting that the uterine environment has an important role in postnatal cardiovascular abnormalities.

AB - Background: Data from cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal studies have suggested that children infected with HIV-1 might have cardiovascular abnormalities. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis in a long-term cohort study. Methods: We measured cardiovascular function every 4-6 months for up to 5 years in a birth cohort of 600 infants born to women infected with HIV-1. We included 93 infants infected with HIV-1 and 463 uninfected infants (internal controls) from the same cohort. We also included a cross-sectionally measured comparison group of 195 healthy children born to mothers who were not infected with HIV-1 (external controls). Findings: Children infected with HIV-1 had a significantly higher heart rate at all ages (mean difference 10 bpm, 95% CI 8-13) than internal controls. At birth, both cohort groups of children had similar low left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening. At 8 months, fractional shortening was similar in internal and external controls, whereas in children infected with HIV-1, fractional shortening remained significantly lower than in controls for the first 20 months of life (mean difference from internal controls at 8 months 3.7%, 2.3-5.1). LV mass was similar at birth in both cohort groups, but became significantly higher in children with HIV-1 from 4-30 months (mean difference 2.4 g at 8 months, 0.9-3.9). Conclusions: Vertically-transmitted HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent cardiovascular abnormalities identifiable shortly after birth. Irrespective of their HIV-1 status, infants born to women infected with HIV-1 have significantly worse cardiac function than other infants, suggesting that the uterine environment has an important role in postnatal cardiovascular abnormalities.

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