Cardiovascular risk score, cognitive decline, and dementia in older Mexican Americans: the role of sex and education.

Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, Mary N. Haan, John M. Neuhaus, Mark Pletcher, Carmen A. Peralta, Lenny López, Eliseo J. Pérez Stable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk with cognitive decline and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment but not dementia (CIND) and the role of education as a modifier of these effects. One thousand one hundred sixteen Mexican American elderly were followed annually in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. Our sex-specific 10-year CVD risk score included baseline age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, smoking, body mass index, and diabetes. From adjusted linear mixed models, errors on the Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MSE) were annually 0.41% lower for women at the 25th percentile of CVD risk, 0.11% higher at the 50th percentile, and 0.83% higher at the 75th percentile (P value of CVDrisk×time <0.01). In men, 3MSE errors were annually 1.76% lower at the 25th percentile of CVD risk, 0.96% lower at the 50th percentile, and 0.12% higher at the 75th percentile (P value of CVDrisk×time <0.01). From adjusted linear mixed models, the annual decrease in the Spanish and English Verbal Learning Test score was 0.09 points for women at the 25th percentile of CVD risk, 0.10 points at the 50th percentile, and 0.12 points at the 75th percentile (P value of CVDrisk×time=0.02). From adjusted Cox models in women, compared with having <6 years of education, having 12+ years of education was associated with a 76% lower hazard of dementia/CIND (95% CI, 0.08 to 0.71) at the 25th percentile of CVD risk and with a 45% lower hazard (95% CI, 0.28 to 1.07) at the 75th percentile (P value of CVDrisk×education=0.05). CVD risk score may provide a useful tool for identifying individuals at risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e004978
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cardiovascular risk score, cognitive decline, and dementia in older Mexican Americans: the role of sex and education.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this