Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis

M. S. Weinstein, D. D. Cardenas, E. J. O'Shaughnessy, M. L. Catanzaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ninety-one subjects with multiple sclerosis were evaluated by carbon dioxide cystometry in the supine, sitting, and standing positions, and by water cystometry in the supine position. Detrusor responses in supine studies were characterized as normal, hyperreflexic, or areflexic. Carbon dioxide and water cystometry were without difference in determining types of detrusor responses. Positional changes (particularly standing) resulted in reassessing of normal supine bladder responses as hyperreflexic. Hyperreflexic was aggravated with sitting and standing. Positional changes did not demonstrate conversion of areflexia to hyperreflexia. The relatively small proportion of dyssynergic sphincter responses probably represents a population of patients with early stage multiple sclerosis. Carbon dioxide cystometry, with positional changes, is relatively safe, easily performed, and an accurate method of evaluating detrusor response in patients with multiple sclerosis who have a changing clinical course or unresponsiveness to treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)923-927
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume69
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Dioxide
Multiple Sclerosis
Supine Position
Posture
Abnormal Reflexes
Water
Urinary Bladder
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Weinstein, M. S., Cardenas, D. D., O'Shaughnessy, E. J., & Catanzaro, M. L. (1988). Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 69(11), 923-927.

Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis. / Weinstein, M. S.; Cardenas, D. D.; O'Shaughnessy, E. J.; Catanzaro, M. L.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 69, No. 11, 01.01.1988, p. 923-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weinstein, MS, Cardenas, DD, O'Shaughnessy, EJ & Catanzaro, ML 1988, 'Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 69, no. 11, pp. 923-927.
Weinstein MS, Cardenas DD, O'Shaughnessy EJ, Catanzaro ML. Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1988 Jan 1;69(11):923-927.
Weinstein, M. S. ; Cardenas, D. D. ; O'Shaughnessy, E. J. ; Catanzaro, M. L. / Carbon dioxide cystometry and postural changes in patients with multiple sclerosis. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1988 ; Vol. 69, No. 11. pp. 923-927.
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