Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic

Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation

Jeremy T. Mathis, Jacqueline M. Grebmeier, Dennis A Hansell, Russell R. Hopcroft, David L. Kirchman, Sang H. Lee, S. Bradley Moran, Nicholas R. Bates, Sam Van Laningham, Jessica N. Cross, Wei Jun Cai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Arctic Ocean is an important sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with a recent estimate suggesting that the region accounts for as much as 15 % of the global uptake of CO2. The western Arctic Ocean, in particular is a strong ocean sink for CO2, especially in the Chukchi Sea during the open water season when rates of primary production can reach as high as 150 g C m -2. The Arctic marine carbon cycle, the exchange of CO2between the ocean and atmosphere, and the fate of carbon fi xed by marine phytoplankton appear particularly sensitive to environmental changes, including sea ice loss, warming temperatures, changes in the timing and location of primary production, changes in ocean circulation and freshwater inputs, and even the impacts of ocean acidifi cation. In the near term, further sea ice loss and other environmental changes are expected to cause a limited net increase in primary production in Arctic surface waters. However, recent studies suggest that these enhanced rates of primary production could be short lived or not occur at all, as warming surface waters and increases in freshwater runoff and sea ice melt enhance stratifi cation and limit mixing of nutrient-rich waters into the euphotic zone. Here, we provide a review of the current state of knowledge that exists about the rates of primary production in the western Arctic as well as the fate of organic carbon fi xed by primary produces and role that these processes play in ocean acidifi cation in the region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages223-268
Number of pages46
ISBN (Print)9789401788632, 9789401788625
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

biogeochemistry
primary production
cation
carbon
ocean
sea ice
environmental change
warming
surface water
freshwater input
euphotic zone
open water
carbon cycle
carbon dioxide
organic carbon
phytoplankton
melt
runoff
atmosphere
nutrient

Keywords

  • Carbon cycle
  • Grazing
  • Net community production
  • Ocean acidifi cation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Mathis, J. T., Grebmeier, J. M., Hansell, D. A., Hopcroft, R. R., Kirchman, D. L., Lee, S. H., ... Cai, W. J. (2014). Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic: Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation. In The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment (pp. 223-268). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_9

Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic : Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation. / Mathis, Jeremy T.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Hansell, Dennis A; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Kirchman, David L.; Lee, Sang H.; Moran, S. Bradley; Bates, Nicholas R.; Van Laningham, Sam; Cross, Jessica N.; Cai, Wei Jun.

The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment. Springer Netherlands, 2014. p. 223-268.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Mathis, JT, Grebmeier, JM, Hansell, DA, Hopcroft, RR, Kirchman, DL, Lee, SH, Moran, SB, Bates, NR, Van Laningham, S, Cross, JN & Cai, WJ 2014, Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic: Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation. in The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment. Springer Netherlands, pp. 223-268. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_9
Mathis JT, Grebmeier JM, Hansell DA, Hopcroft RR, Kirchman DL, Lee SH et al. Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic: Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation. In The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment. Springer Netherlands. 2014. p. 223-268 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_9
Mathis, Jeremy T. ; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M. ; Hansell, Dennis A ; Hopcroft, Russell R. ; Kirchman, David L. ; Lee, Sang H. ; Moran, S. Bradley ; Bates, Nicholas R. ; Van Laningham, Sam ; Cross, Jessica N. ; Cai, Wei Jun. / Carbon biogeochemistry of the western arctic : Primary production, carbon export and the controls on ocean acidifi cation. The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment. Springer Netherlands, 2014. pp. 223-268
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